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Spraying kitchen cabinets - Turner52 - 04-11-2019

Building a set of cabinets for daughter and son in law.Will be painted, I refuse to finish them. Not my area of expertise. What kind of finish would you recommend as well as what type and model of spray gun? Probably a 1 time use for them so what gun will do a good job for the least amount of money. Not worth having a lousy finish to save a few bucks on the gun, but no reason for them to overspend on something better than they need to get this job done.


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - ajkoontz - 04-11-2019

I'm painting the kitchen cabinets I am building and I bought a Graco Tru Coat 360 sprayer at Lowes. FWIW, I have the older model than the one they sell now (the new model is a lot less $$). I'm not saying this is the best way, but it is A way. It eliminates the brush marks in any case and looks good enough to me. I'm using SW paint. I forget the type of paint, but it is their 'cabinet' paint. I'm not done yet, but I try as much as possible to paint everything before install, then touch up with brush as needed. Again, probably not the best way, but it's working for me. The graco gun is nice to have for doing doors, trim and the like. It's a gun for heavy latex style paint, so not much good for any other WW project type stuff (ie- shellac). Since I have it, I've found I use the graco gun for a lot of small projects around the house. It sprays walls, ceilings, etc. nicely and is relatively easy to clean up. I've done at over a dozen full size doors, a hundred feet or so of trim, plus a kitchen full of cabinets so the longevity seems to be pretty decent. I have the corded version, but they make a corless.


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - ajkoontz - 04-11-2019

Edit to add, the graco I bought works like any other airless paint sprayer, although they don't use the same type nozzles. They only make about 3 sizes for the trucoat 360. I bought the smallest (width, not nozzle size) they make but I had to find it online. I also have a regular airless sprayer, which would work the same for painting cabinets, but the quantity of paint in the hose plus clean-up make the 360 a better choice IMO. I bought it for the cabinets, but I do a lot of home improvement so I would buy it again if this one goes down.

I also looked up the paint. It is this- https://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/products/proclassic-interior-waterbased-acrylicalkyd
40% off at SW this weekend.


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - jteneyck - 04-11-2019

(04-11-2019, 11:59 AM)Turner52 Wrote: Building a set of cabinets for daughter and son in law.Will be painted, I refuse to finish them. Not my area of expertise. What kind of finish would you recommend as well as what type and model of spray gun? Probably a 1 time use for them so what gun will do a good job for the least amount of money. Not worth having a lousy finish to save a few bucks on the gun, but no reason for them to overspend on something better than they need to get this job done.

If you have a compressor you could use a pressure assisted HVLP conversion gun, such as the Qualspray AM-6008 SmartPak from Homestead Finishing at about $380.  If you don't have a compressor you could opt for an Earlex turbine unit like the Earlex 5500, also around $380.  The advantage of these HVLP guns is they don't put out paint as fast as airless guns; they are more for fine finish work.  They also will spray a wider range of products, from water based dyes up to ProClassic.  

Some folks consider a brushed painted finish to be the best choice for cabinets in Arts and Crafts, Victorian, etc. style homes.  My preference is sprayed, but thought I'd point that out because even the best brush is pretty cheap.  And FWIW,  ProClassic and BM's Advance both go on very well with a good brush.  

Whichever route you take use a high quality lacquer or paint and recommended primer.  Target Coatings EM-6000 pigmented lacquer can be tinted to any BM color and would be a great spray choice.  The two products mentioned earlier spray and brush great, too, and also are very durable.  Advance takes a really long time to cure, it's only downside, so if time is important don't use that product.  PPG's 250 VOC Breakhrough would be another excellent choice.  

John


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - Cooler - 04-11-2019

The bigger issue, in my opinion, is using the right paint.  

Benjamin Moore makes Advance that is well-regarded but takes anywhere from 10 days to 30 days to cure depending upon who you listen to.

I spray Pittsburgh Paint's Breakthrough! 250 VOC which dries in 20 minutes and can be put into use the same day it is shot.  It dries so fast that it is suggested that you filter it through a paper filter each time you use it.    But be careful that you get the 250 VOC stuff; the 50 VOC Breakthrough! is not rated for cabinet work.

Sherwin Williams makes Emerald that that is also supposed to be suitable for cabinet work.

The Breakthrough! dries very fast and very hard and does not have "blocking" issues (where one painted surface sticks to another).  It's satin is towards the matte end of the range, but I like it.  It also has excellent adhesion with most substrates.

I am told that Advance brushes better and self-levels (due, no doubt to the slow cure rate).

I have also painted cabinets with a foam brush using General Finishes "milk paint" a modern acrylic version of milk paint.  When it dries there is not a trace of brush marks or runs.  Amazing stuff.  But totally matte finish and probably requires a clear topcoat for durability.  It is an indoor and exterior rated paint. 

Insl-x makes a cabinet-specific paint that has had good reviews.  None of the local dealers carry the stuff so I have not tried it.
http://www.insl-x.com/


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - ajkoontz - 04-12-2019

(04-11-2019, 03:38 PM)Cooler Wrote: The bigger issue, in my opinion, is using the right paint.  

Benjamin Moore makes Advance that is well-regarded but takes anywhere from 10 days to 30 days to cure depending upon who you listen to.

I spray Pittsburgh Paint's Breakthrough! 250 VOC which dries in 20 minutes and can be put into use the same day it is shot.  It dries so fast that it is suggested that you filter it through a paper filter each time you use it.    But be careful that you get the 250 VOC stuff; the 50 VOC Breakthrough! is not rated for cabinet work.

Sherwin Williams makes Emerald that that is also supposed to be suitable for cabinet work.

The Breakthrough! dries very fast and very hard and does not have "blocking" issues (where one painted surface sticks to another).  It's satin is towards the matte end of the range, but I like it.  It also has excellent adhesion with most substrates.

I am told that Advance brushes better and self-levels (due, no doubt to the slow cure rate).

I have also painted cabinets with a foam brush using General Finishes "chalk paint" a modern acrylic version of chalk paint.  When it dries there is not a trace of brush marks or runs.  Amazing stuff.  But totally matte finish and probably requires a clear topcoat for durability.  It is an indoor and exterior rated paint. 

Insl-x makes a cabinet-specific paint that has had good reviews.  None of the local dealers carry the stuff so I have not tried it.
http://www.insl-x.com/

I'm glad someone mentioned chalk paint, the bane of antique purists across the land.  I would never use it to paint an antique like you see, but I would give it a hard look to finish kitchen cabinets.


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - Cooler - 04-15-2019

(04-12-2019, 05:38 PM)ajkoontz Wrote: I'm glad someone mentioned chalk paint, the bane of antique purists across the land.  I would never use it to paint an antique like you see, but I would give it a hard look to finish kitchen cabinets.

It is a very forgiving finish to apply.  But, as mentioned, it probably needs a topcoat for kitchen cabinets.  I painted some black and the finish was flawless.  I went to Sherwin-Williams and asked them to match a painted out sample with their best interior matte finish. The color matching was perfect, but the application fell well short of the G-F chalk paint.

When I top coated the black with a satin Polycrylic, the flatter agent turned the finish to a dark gray.  I had to go with a gloss top coat (looks very good).  The chalk paint scuffs easily and the scuff marks are shiny.  

I've settled on the PPG Breakthrough! 250 VOC.  (Do not try the 50 VOC, you will be disappointed if you do).  PPG always includes the "!" with Breakthrough! and I do too.

It sprays easily once thinned to the correct viscosity.  I use HVLP spray equipment.  It is a very watery finish and I needed 3 coats for excellent results.  I tried using this stuff over SealCoat and it "gatored" and had to be sanded off.  The finish has excellent adhesion and it dries very fast. I used no primer going forward.  It is only one hour between coats, but because of the  fast drying, I cleaned the gun each time and I filtered the paint going back into the gun.    

I waited overnight to install, but I've been told the 4 to 8 hours is all you need for a full cure.  It is hard to find though.  Everyone is carrying the 50 VOC and they are reluctant to order the 250 VOC stuff as they have to order 4 gallons and I only needed one.


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - jteneyck - 04-15-2019

Cooler, I've read your favorable comments about GF's Milk Paint several times, but never Chalk Paint until now.  Are you sure that's what you used?  

John


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - Cooler - 04-15-2019

(04-15-2019, 10:35 AM)jteneyck Wrote: Cooler, I've read your favorable comments about GF's Milk Paint several times, but never Chalk Paint until now.  Are you sure that's what you used?  

John
My error.  I got them confused.  I should have written "milk paint".  I will correct.  Thanks.


RE: Spraying kitchen cabinets - Rob Young - 04-15-2019

(04-15-2019, 10:59 AM)Cooler Wrote: My error.  I got them confused.  I should have written "milk paint".  I will correct.  Thanks.

The GF "milk" paint is essentially an acrylic. Sprays well, levels well, thin with a splash of water. It has been my experience with the GF stuff that even the dark colors are a bit transparent and it is a minimum of 2 coats if you want to completely obscure grain, usually 3. Dries pretty quick being a water borne acrylic. So spray, wait, scuff, spray, etc. Does need a top coat of some kind if you want scratch resistance.

Milk paint made with, well milk, will be casein based and is quite durable if a bit powdery. I've never tried spraying it but heard legends of it being done. Filter, filter, filter was what they wrote. Also, I think they made it up the day before and let it slake overnight in the fridge. I've only brushed on the real stuff and it worked very well. Again, tends toward the transparent side but eventually can get opaque coverage.