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Router table - Halfathumb - 07-28-2020

I've decided to replace my existing RT, but I can't decide to build Norm Abram's RT or put in my TS side table.

Of you who have or have had your RT in the side table, what do you like about it and what don't you like about it?

Jim


RE: Router table - fredhargis - 07-28-2020

I went from the table saw wing to a Norm style table. The TS option is nice; takes up no extra space and you can use the TS fence if you decide to do so. But if you try to go back and forth between setups it gets a little unhandy. Another big deal for me was that my saw was on a mobile base, and the addition of the extra weight on the right side really taxed the base (Delta base that raised to right side for movement). I was also never clever enough to figure out a good DC arrangement...at least not one to my satisfaction. You can catch dust at the fence easily enough, but it's a little harder to do it under the table.


RE: Router table - Aram - 07-28-2020

(07-28-2020, 12:06 PM)Halfathumb Wrote: I've decided to replace my existing RT, but I can't decide to build Norm Abram's RT or put in my TS side table.

Of you who have or have had your RT in the side table, what do you like about it and what don't you like about it?

Jim

My router table is on the end of my cabinet saw. I built a fence for it, so there isn't much competition between the RT and the table saw. The only hassle is when I need to crosscut long boards. That means removing the bit, and moving or removing the router table fence. Both of those things might have been carefully set. That has not happened often, though.


RE: Router table - Stwood_ - 07-28-2020

I didn't really need it, but installed a router in the right wing of the table saw.
Used it one time. I ended up covering the hole back up, as flexy material such as 1/4" ply would catch in the hole every time I went to rip some.
Never used the router in it again.


RE: Router table - fredhargis - 07-28-2020

(07-28-2020, 02:22 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: I ended up covering the hole back up, as flexy material such as 1/4" ply would catch in the hole every time I went to rip some.
Never used the router in it again.

Very good point. When I had mine the plate I used had changeable inserts with different size holes. One of them was a "no hole" insert to prevent such problems....it also kept me from knocking small screws and such down into the router motor when I was doing some occassional tinkering on the extension wing.


RE: Router table - Hank Knight - 07-28-2020

(07-28-2020, 12:06 PM)Halfathumb Wrote: I've decided to replace my existing RT, but I can't decide to build Norm Abram's RT or put in my TS side table.

Of you who have or have had your RT in the side table, what do you like about it and what don't you like about it?

Jim

I have a very small shop. There is no room for a separate router table. I've used a table saw extension router table for years and am very comfortable with it. A Separate set-up would be more convenient, but, aside from the space saving, the table saw extension has a few advantages.

The biggest advantage is the dust collection. I can move the D/C flexible hose from my Excalibur blade guard to my router table to take care of the above-the-table dust and chips. I have another duct that wyes off the duct that services the saw cabinet to handle the below-the-table D/C for the router table extension. This set-up captures almost 100% of the dust and chips from my router table. Photos:


IMG_0169 by Hank Knight, on Flickr


IMG_4418 by Hank Knight, on Flickr

Not often, but occasionally I need to route a wide panel on the router table. Rather than setting up some jury-rigged contraption to support the panel, I can simply move the fence to the other side of the bit, feed from the other side and I have a 52" width of saw table to support the panel.

Like Fred, I also use a blank router table insert to cover the hole when I'm not using the router. It keeps dust, chips and trash from falling through the hole into the router motor.

There's no question that a stand-alone router table is more convenient. But, if you have space issues, a router table extension for your table saw is a great space saver. The inconvenience is an easy trade-off for the space saved.


RE: Router table - sniper - 07-28-2020

(07-28-2020, 02:32 PM)fredhargis Wrote: Very good point. When I had mine the plate I used had changeable inserts with different size holes. One of them was a "no hole" insert to prevent such problems....it also kept me from knocking small screws and such down into the router motor when I was doing some occassional tinkering on the extension wing.

I always wondered what that no hole insert was for, thanks.

If you have the room, I would make Norm's router table. I did that and put a Woodpecker RT top/fence/plate on it and love it. 1 big advantage with this is the RT gives you a nice cabinet to store all your router bits and accessories in. Likewise, you can build a cabinet that fits under the right side TS wing to hold your TS accessories.


RE: Router table - fredhargis - 07-29-2020

Hank, I've not seen an Excalibur setup like yours. Did you modify the bigger unit, or is that something that was offered at one time?


RE: Router table - Hank Knight - 07-29-2020

(07-29-2020, 06:18 AM)fredhargis Wrote: Hank, I've not seen an Excalibur setup like yours. Did you modify the bigger unit, or is that something that was offered at one time?

Fred Excalibur sold a ceiling mount for their blade guard. It's basically the blade guard/dust collector with a bracket attached for mounting to a fixed beam or post suspended from the ceiling instead of the big tubular arm that's attached to the end of the saw table. I never liked the big over-arm arrangement, so I ordered the ceiling mount. I like it, but it limits how much you can move your saw around since the guard is not attached to the saw. I made a bracket for the blade guard that allows about 10" of lateral adjustment, but if you're in the habit of rolling your saw around the shop, this would be an unsatisfactory arrangement. My saw is stationary, so it's not a problem for me. Here are photos of my blade guard and the bracket:


IMG_4411 by Hank Knight, on Flickr


IMG_4413 by Hank Knight, on Flickr


RE: Router table - Halfathumb - 07-29-2020

(07-28-2020, 09:53 PM)sniper Wrote: I always wondered what that no hole insert was for, thanks.

If you have the room, I would make Norm's router table.  I did that and put a Woodpecker RT top/fence/plate on it and love it.  1 big advantage with this is the RT gives you a nice cabinet to store all your router bits and accessories in.  Likewise, you can  build a cabinet that fits under the right side TS wing to hold your TS accessories.

My shop seems to be shrinking since 1998 when I had the home built. I'm the only one in the neighborhood that don'e have a garage, I have a 700 SF shop. But I'll probably but RT on a good set of wheels like my current table. I already have a good JessEM lift which I like a lot.

Jim