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Plywood Edging for paint - sroxberg - 08-01-2020

I am actually building some garage cabinets from MDO (Medium Density Overlay) which is a resin impregnated paper face on both sides.

How should I great the edges to get a decent, not perfect paint job?

I was considering using a wood filler and then a light sanding.

I guess I could do a thin solid pine edging but that would seem to be more work.

Any thoughts on how you would do this?

Thanks in advance for your input.


RE: Plywood Edging for paint - KC - 08-01-2020

(08-01-2020, 06:02 PM)sroxberg Wrote: I am actually building some garage cabinets from MDO (Medium Density Overlay) which is a resin impregnated paper face on both sides.

How should I great the edges to get a decent, not perfect paint job?

I was considering using a wood filler and then a light sanding.

I guess I could do a thin solid pine edging but that would seem to be more work.

Any thoughts on how you would do this?

Thanks in advance for your input.

I use oil based KILZ on MDF... it'll leave a smooth finish on the edges after light sanding.  On MDF cabinets I've made U used MDF for the face frame as well.


RE: Plywood Edging for paint - jteneyck - 08-01-2020

Veneer tape is likely the fastest approach.  

John


RE: Plywood Edging for paint - handi - 08-01-2020

(08-01-2020, 06:02 PM)sroxberg Wrote: I am actually building some garage cabinets from MDO (Medium Density Overlay) which is a resin impregnated paper face on both sides.

How should I great the edges to get a decent, not perfect paint job?

I was considering using a wood filler and then a light sanding.

I guess I could do a thin solid pine edging but that would seem to be more work.

Any thoughts on how you would do this?

Thanks in advance for your input.
MDO is not a void free plywood, trying to fill the edges before painting is going to be a lot of work and may never look good. 

Thin wood edge banding is not difficult, and even decent pine or poplar will paint up well.

The other option is edge banding tape. You can buy it iron on, self adhesive or use a permanent 2- sided tape like Fastcap sells. Tape can be trimmed easily with a knife, chisel or even sanding block. You can also buy dedicated trimmers for short money.


RE: Plywood Edging for paint - MstrCarpenter - 08-02-2020

On occasion I make raised panel wainscoting with MDF using a typical cabinet door panel raising bit along with the cope and stick bits. The easiest way to get a good finish is to first lock the fibers down with with a sandable sealer; two coats of Kiltz usually does it. Give it a quick sanding to knock off the raised fibers then brush or wipe on some thinned down joint compound to fill all the small voids. Now when you sand it you'll see that the milled edges are almost as hard as the face so it's quite easy to keep sharp edges on the profile. If you're going to ease the corners, do it before sealing so they'll be durable too. I know it looks like a lot of steps but it's actually a quick process; ready to prime and paint with your favorite finish.


RE: Plywood Edging for paint - fredhargis - 08-02-2020

I think the filling technique is going to be a lot more work than just edging it with wood strips (pick your species) or veneer tape. Either is going to work out well.


RE: Plywood Edging for paint - Cooler - 08-03-2020

(08-02-2020, 12:00 AM)MstrCarpenter Wrote: On occasion I make raised panel wainscoting with MDF using a typical cabinet door panel raising bit along with the cope and stick bits. The easiest way to get a good finish is to first lock the fibers down with with a sandable sealer; two coats of Kiltz usually does it. Give it a quick sanding to knock off the raised fibers then brush or wipe on some thinned down joint compound to fill all the small voids. Now when you sand it you'll see that the milled edges are almost as hard as the face so it's quite easy to keep sharp edges on the profile. If you're going to ease the corners, do it before sealing so they'll be durable too. I know it looks like a lot of steps but it's actually a quick process; ready to prime and paint with your favorite finish.

I first sand the machined surfaces and then apply Park's grain filler which applies like shoe polish with a rag and dries in a half an hour.  It sands very easily and leaves a perfectly smooth finish.  I then sand again and use sealcoat on the edges only.  But any shellac based primer would work.

The problem with a water based paint or primer is that the water will "raise the grain" (which is probably the wrong term) and leave a surface looking like 40 grit sandpaper.  So sealing before applying water based finishes is important. 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Parks-Pro-Finisher-1-qt-Red-Oak-Wood-Filler-138914/202056470