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RE: Kitchen Build Thread - MstrCarpenter - 06-27-2022

I was actually referring to either or both types of speaker wire. I removed some ceiling speakers on a commercial job today. The wire was 16 or 18 ga. stranded with jacket. The speaker terminals are also the mounting posts. The studs, about the same as a 6-32, pierced the ceiling tile, a plastic nut held them in place, and an orange wire nut weld the wires to them. The center portion was left exposed. The splices above the ceiling were just wire nuts that pulled apart easily. The speakers had no safety wires, and they would hurt just as much, if not more, than a can light if Fire Fighters pulled the grid down.

I've installed quite a few mini splits, and the "control wire" is 14 ga. 4 conductors (one is equipment ground) jacketed. But it is not even close to NM-B, and it gets concealed.

And joking aside, maybe you can educate me on this. How does the "wattage" of speakers compare to watts of either A.C. or D.C.? I know speaker frequency is usually changing, but that doesn't relate, to my knowledge, to watts.


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - mound - 08-08-2022

Linking to my floor leveling thread


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - mound - 09-12-2022

Fun with faux beams


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - mound - 10-05-2022

One thing I haven't mentioned in this thread is permits.

Way back when I first started into the project, I hired a local home improvement company to demo and change the structure. They hooked me up with a proper architect and then did the demo and installed the beams.

I asked them clearly up front "do I need a permit for this?" and they very clearly said "no"

In my heart of hearts, I knew this was a lie, but I went with it.  Every single tradesperson I ever encounter feeds the same line "don't tell the town! don't bother with permits! none of their business!" etc. etc..  So I went with it.

But as the point of closing up the walls approached, I had a change of heart. I knew a big structure change and complete rewire did need a permit and inspections, and I knew that if I closed things up I couldn't go back, and so I humbly went to the town, on my own accord, and told them what I was doing. 

I submitted the application along with my stamped architect drawing and listed myself as the GC. The plan inspector gave me a bit of a harsh talking to "why would you think you could do something like this on your own without a permit? are you a contractor? etc.."  After explaining myself, it turned into a friendly conversation.

I was required to have the architect produce a new set of drawings to illustrate exactly what framing changes were made (given that it was already done) and things like the pocket door opening weren't in the original plans. I was told if the work doesn't match the drawings, it'll fail.  So I had to go back to the architect, pay him a small bit more, wait for all that to be done, and finally I was given the permit. They didn't even double charge me (like they said there were going to, for having started the work without a permit.)

Anyway, framing inspection just happened and passed.  Rough electrical inspection should happen this week, at which point I can put the insulation back in, get that inspected and finally get the drywall up (which I'm hiring out, and he's busy until end of this month).

So, much closer! And it's all legit with the town.

My advice to anybody reading along who hesitates to go to the town for permits and inspections, don't be scared. They are there to help and I'm left with a higher comfort level. I see it as a cheap insurance policy.


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - stav - 10-05-2022

When I did my kitchen I heard the same stuff about getting permits but it just didn't seem right to me.  I got the permits and the framing guy passed me easy since I had drawings and everything matched up. The electrical inspector, knowing I was doing all the work and wiring, helped me out quite a bit.  He failed my first inspection because I didn't have enough outlets and then he gave me a lot of pointers on how to wire and things to do to make the next inspector happy just in case it wasn't him.  The next inspection was easy. 

I will caveat that I live in the county and have been told that the city inspectors in my area are not as forgiving.


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - joe1086 - 10-05-2022

(10-05-2022, 08:16 AM)mound Wrote: My advice to anybody reading along who hesitates to go to the town for permits and inspections, don't be scared. They are there to help and I'm left with a higher comfort level. I see it as a cheap insurance policy.

That's probably true most of the time, but I'm sure there are some knucklehead inspectors out there that either love being adversarial or are idjiots. I used to have the same reluctance about permits and inspections when 20+ years ago like you. 

But getting permits and inspections is no big deal here other than being an added cost...so that's what we do now. Plus I sleep better at night.


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - brianwelch - 10-05-2022

Around here (SEPA), getting permits is the way to get your real estate taxes increased...


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - mound - 10-05-2022

(10-05-2022, 03:24 PM)brianwelch Wrote: Around here (SEPA), getting permits is the way to get your real estate taxes increased...

I've heard that too, will be curious to see..  I didn't add any square footage and technically removed a whole bathroom (albeit creating a much nicer kitchen) so I suppose mine should go DOWN


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - Snipe Hunter - 10-05-2022

(10-05-2022, 03:24 PM)brianwelch Wrote: Around here (SEPA), getting permits is the way to get your real estate taxes increased...

Sq footage, number of beds and baths is usually the tax basis


RE: Kitchen Build Thread - brianwelch - 10-06-2022

I added sf, and the county improperly calculated it based on a drive by. My permit application clearly/accurately identifed the size my addition. They flat out told me that the filing for a permit was used as a "tickler" to re-assess.
I was able to challenge and receive a reduced increase. I had no idea of the miscalculation until I met with the assessment folks and saw the sketch of my home on the conference table showing the dimensions they used. Not willing to take my word for it, we actually left the meeting, drove 30 minutes to my house and walked/measured the property again. They did have an unexpected sense of humor. We walked down into my obviously unfinished basement (think 1880 house, 7' to underside of exposed joists, water heater, furnace, duct and utilities, etc, etc). Assessor looked at me and in a total deadpan voice, "oh, we didn't realize you had a finished basement"...then winked...