Wood Carving Knives
#31
  Re: RE: Wood Carving Knives by Steve Friedman (Simon, Sorry for ...)
(12-14-2018, 01:08 AM)Steve Friedman Wrote: Simon,

Sorry for not doing this earlier, but I don't think we know enough about what why you want a carving knife.

What do you want the piece of wood to look like when you're done with it?  A figurine?  a face?  A spoon?  A walking stick?  If you look at the pictures of the amazing array of knives that Jack (Timberwolf) made, you can see that they're each going to do different things well.

The other question is what you find comfortable.  If you're using a knife for a couple of hours at a time, your hands will be miserable unless the handle and blade size are comfortable.  Go play at your nearest Woodcraft or Rockler.  Or find someone near you who has some carving knives and play with them.  It won't take long for you to find what feels good.

As for folders, they may be easier to carry around and you can definitely make stuff with them, but I'm not sure a folder is ever going to be as comfortable as a fixed blade knife.

Finally, if you wait to find the perfect knife, you'll never carve anything.  I will likely never stop searching for the perfect knife, even though I realize that perfection doesn't exist.  It's just a tease.

Over the years, you'll end up experimenting with lots of different knives.  You'll love some and you'll hate some.  But the most important thing is to get a blade into your hands and start cutting some wood.

Just my $0.02.

Steve
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
But the most important thing is to get a blade into your hands and start cutting some wood.

Bingo !!!!! Steve nailed it!!!!!!..I have concluded after many years of "research", that the "perfect" knife does NOT exist..That is why we need so many of them...the search must go on!!!!!!..It's all about The "Relentless Pursuit of Perfection" !!!!!!! Laugh Laugh
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#32
  Re: Wood Carving Knives by cajunwoodworks (Just wondering what ...)
Jack, how do you fix the blades into the handles?  I looked at the Warren knife blades and the tang seemed too short to withstand the pressure of the blade in the handle.  Thanks.
               -Howard
Reply
#33
  Re: Question for Jack by Howard Pollack (Jack, how do you fix...)
(12-14-2018, 11:30 AM)Howard Pollack Wrote: Jack, how do you fix the blades into the handles?  I looked at the Warren knife blades and the tang seemed too short to withstand the pressure of the blade in the handle.  Thanks.
               -Howard

................
Howard, I drill and elongate the hole in the handle, grind the tang portion of the blade so that it fits in the hole about an inch or so, then use JB  Weld epoxy to secure it...rough up the tang on the grinder before insertion so the epoxy has a good "bite" on the steel..I have done it this way for years and have never had one break through the wood in hard use...even in wood that isn't as hard as the tropicals..As I mentioned earlier, I have made brass ferrules for some of the knives but they are for "decorative" purposes only...the epoxy is pretty tough stuff and has a good grip on both the steel and the wood...You could also wrap copper or stainless steel wire {or sinew} around the wood to act as a reinforcement if need be, but I have not found it necessary.
     If I were to make a knife for some heavy duty work  such as a hook knife might encounter, or for where levering may be needed, I might want to include a ferrule..But in that case, the blade would also want to be thicker...Some of the knives I made with HSS parting blades measure around .060" and they are very strong and they don't require hardening after grinding them to shape...I would say that 95% of the carving that I do, is done "in the hand"..the blades that are secured with good epoxy never come loose or break through the wood..You can see that Flexcut as well as many other blade makers use epoxy to secure their blades and do not use rivets...Flexcut doesn't even use tropical hardwoods or ferrules...Like anything else, the tool has to fit the work that's at hand... Big Grin

Here's a likeness of me on the right...... Laugh





I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#34
  Re: RE: Wood Carving Knives by cajunwoodworks ([quote='hbmcc' pid='...)
(12-13-2018, 08:23 PM)cajunwoodworks Wrote: SNIP

HBMCC, what is your reasoning for staying away from O1?  I can see D2 being good for its higher carbon content but not rusting. That said I know I just need to grab a few different knives and get after it and see what sticks.

Timberwolf, Seems like D2 is treating you well, I'll keep that in mind. M2 is supposed to be pretty good to and if I recall Spyderco has a model or two made with it that I have heard good things about.

Edit: Here is the link I mentioned above... best whittling knife and wood carving knife sets. Also, I meant to say how nice that collection is Timber, very cool!

Cajun, my comment was directed toward carving/whittling in general. Aging brings in a new set of variables, touched on by others, here.

On the steel front, you will find every type rusts, even stainless, especially the types in your tool holder. We accept the fact and maintain tools to minimize rust. Rust in a carver or knife is the least of your worries. 

The killer is going to be maintaining the sharp edge. Jack has dedicated machines at hand to sharpen and likely hone his tool steels (D2, M2)--easy peachy. 

My sharpening station is a kitchen table and everything is manual. Honing can be a leather strop charged with compound, or diamonds in the case of hard steel. If I am going to smell like a camp fire, I might have a credit card diamond steel for the D2 Oar Carvers. The carving preachers say hone and polish at the slightest resistance--all the time, basically. To be interesting (and focussed) you cannot take ten minutes to hone a razor edge back into D2 steel every 20 minutes and enjoy carving. 

I love Japanese chisels, actually enjoy my D2 carvers, but I hate the work to keep them sharp. 

Handling comfort is very personal, but some things are given: A folding pocket knife will be a lifetime tool and still not work for chip carving. I had fantasies of using my two Oar carvers for that. The first was the double blade that carries the fearful friction fold of almost every pocket knife. The second is a single but with a locking blade. Titusville is so bad at construction that my single must stay open or it will never fold open again. They still work fine for making a hot-dog stick; and, other stuff, too. I have a Flexcut chip knife. That steel paddle will take a while to grind down and make carving easy. Right now, it is tough enough to clean out the bottom of excavations. The fishtail handle is still a humm-bug? for modifications. My latest chip carver is a Barton. It is the best slicing so far, but I don't know about the handle. Yuk! 

So, after $300 to $400, I am still working on getting a comfortable chip carving knife. And, short of the Barton, all my knives have been commended on this thread. Your mileage is going to be very personal, so don't criticize the other carvers. Behind every pro is a bushell basket of chip carving knives; some "good", some not so .... for him; or me.

I really think your best (cheapest) option in selection is to pick a carving type, buy a long-running class--not just a couple hours--test the provided tools, talk to the teacher, and then put one tentative foot forward for the minimum number of tools needed. Two chip knives, all I need, cost me about $200 each, so far.
Reply
#35
  Re: RE: Wood Carving Knives by hbmcc ([quote='cajunwoodwor...)
(12-14-2018, 01:47 PM)hbmcc Wrote: I really think your best (cheapest) option in selection is to pick a carving type, buy a long-running class--not just a couple hours--test the provided tools, talk to the teacher, and then put one tentative foot forward for the minimum number of tools needed. Two chip knives, all I need, cost me about $200 each, so far.

Ultimately I think this is a great idea!!!! Honestly I could see getting use out of both folders and fixed blades but until I try out several all the advice on "no best carver" is sound! Great discussion all around.
Reply
#36
  Re: Wood Carving Knives by cajunwoodworks (Just wondering what ...)
(12-12-2018, 07:35 PM)cajunwoodworks Wrote: Just wondering what everyone's opinion is on the best whittling knife or wood carving knife sets? I see folks referencing Pfiel a bit on the forum but is there any consensus on what brand or particular knife is highly regarded? I'm interested in both pocket folders and fixed blades. 

Feel free to share pictures of your collection and carvings for reference!

~Cajun

I have Pfeil, and have been very very pleased.
MAKE: Void your warranty, violate a user agreement, fry a circuit, blow a fuse, poke an eye out... http://www.makezine.com

No Good Deed Goes Unpunished

Reply
#37
  Re: RE: Wood Carving Knives by cajunwoodworks ([quote='hbmcc' pid='...)
(12-14-2018, 02:33 PM)cajunwoodworks Wrote: Ultimately I think this is a great idea!!!! Honestly I could see getting use out of both folders and fixed blades but until I try out several all the advice on "no best carver" is sound! Great discussion all around.

............
I understand that Oar carvers were made by Queen Steel and have discontinued business...You "may" still be able to get them at "Tools for working wood" or at this carving supply...but I guess when they are gone...they're gone... Crazy

http://stadtlandercarvings.com/Oar-Carvi...c_188.html
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#38
  Re: RE: Wood Carving Knives by hbmcc ([quote='cajunwoodwor...)
(12-14-2018, 01:47 PM)hbmcc Wrote: Cajun, my comment was directed toward carving/whittling in general. Aging brings in a new set of variables, touched on by others, here.

On the steel front, you will find every type rusts, even stainless, especially the types in your tool holder. We accept the fact and maintain tools to minimize rust. Rust in a carver or knife is the least of your worries. 

The killer is going to be maintaining the sharp edge. Jack has dedicated machines at hand to sharpen and likely hone his tool steels (D2, M2)--easy peachy. 

My sharpening station is a kitchen table and everything is manual. Honing can be a leather strop charged with compound, or diamonds in the case of hard steel. If I am going to smell like a camp fire, I might have a credit card diamond steel for the D2 Oar Carvers. The carving preachers say hone and polish at the slightest resistance--all the time, basically. To be interesting (and focussed) you cannot take ten minutes to hone a razor edge back into D2 steel every 20 minutes and enjoy carving. 

I love Japanese chisels, actually enjoy my D2 carvers, but I hate the work to keep them sharp. 

Handling comfort is very personal, but some things are given: A folding pocket knife will be a lifetime tool and still not work for chip carving. I had fantasies of using my two Oar carvers for that. The first was the double blade that carries the fearful friction fold of almost every pocket knife. The second is a single but with a locking blade. Titusville is so bad at construction that my single must stay open or it will never fold open again. They still work fine for making a hot-dog stick; and, other stuff, too. I have a Flexcut chip knife. That steel paddle will take a while to grind down and make carving easy. Right now, it is tough enough to clean out the bottom of excavations. The fishtail handle is still a humm-bug? for modifications. My latest chip carver is a Barton. It is the best slicing so far, but I don't know about the handle. Yuk! 

So, after $300 to $400, I am still working on getting a comfortable chip carving knife. And, short of the Barton, all my knives have been commended on this thread. Your mileage is going to be very personal, so don't criticize the other carvers. Behind every pro is a bushell basket of chip carving knives; some "good", some not so .... for him; or me.

I really think your best (cheapest) option in selection is to pick a carving type, buy a long-running class--not just a couple hours--test the provided tools, talk to the teacher, and then put one tentative foot forward for the minimum number of tools needed. Two chip knives, all I need, cost me about $200 each, so far.
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
"My sharpening station is a kitchen table and everything is manual."

For my knife making hobby, I have lots of different machines { too many } Crazy ..I could never do it manually..But if I had to choose single machine that I think is most versatile for "strictly" sharpening it would be the Worksharp 2000..{I have the 3000 but don't use the chisel sharpening jig that comes with it.}..Plus I would buy the 3,000 grit diamond disc from Amazon. The diamond disc makes all the difference!!!!!!..Then make an MDF diamond charged lap wheel for it...It is an "eye-opener".....If you have a bench grinder, you can put a muslin buffing wheel on one side and charge it with chrome oxide and put one of the sharpest edges you will ever get and in record time.....after a short learning curve.....without that "learning curve", you will be able to dull an edge in record time.....but remember that the bench grinder/buffer is the most dangerous machine in your shop in number of accidents!!! Focus on doing it right...EVERY time..
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#39
  Re: RE: Question for Jack by Timberwolf ([quote='Howard Polla...)
(12-14-2018, 11:58 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: Thank you.  -Howard
................
Reply
#40
  Re: Wood Carving Knives by cajunwoodworks (Just wondering what ...)
Jumping in a little late, but I've recently started whittling for various reasons, not the least of which is now that I'm a grandpa, I need to act like one. Wink Actually just adding something that I can do "wherever, whenever".

To that end, I'm more interested in folding knives...I've been carrying pocket knives for everything else, but I'm realizing that many modern pocket knife grinds suck for whittling. Even shaving sharp, they're too blunt/thick to be usable for whittling. I found an old Ward's knife that had better grinds (and apparently carbon steel), but the blades had been abused. I sharpened the sheepsfoot and pen blades, and reprofiled the broken clip blade into something resembling a wharncliffe profile. I'm really enjoying that knife, and eventually will do a little more work on it to make it exactly what I want.

I've also got a couple of old stockman knives with carbon steel blades that need some work, including blade replacement. I'm going to try making new O1 blades in the profiles I want. We'll see what happens.
Dave Arbuckle was kind enough to create a Sketchup model of my WorkMate benchtop: http://www.arbolloco.com/sketchup/MauleS...nchtop.skp
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 3 Guest(s)