#12
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that my grandfather gave me around 40 years ago.
He told me they were for steel, and some wood sometimes.

I've used them on steel, a lot.

I grabbed a 1/2" bit the other day and was going to drill some holes for a dowel in some pine. After the smoke cleared out of the shop, I noticed that it blowed the bottom of the wood 2x out.
Are these not the correct bits? I remember reading somewhere that someone now makes a special bit for wood? Some brad point thing? What's a brad got to do with a drill bit?
Steve





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#13
  So I've got these drill bits Stwood_ that my grandfather ...
You say you used them a lot for steel. Did you have coolant attached to the drill bit? For drilling steel you should have coolant attached and flowing through the drill so it will stay sharp and cool. Without coolant the drill will get dull and finally get rounded on the end that is supposed to cut. If that happens then of course when you use the drill bit on wooden 2X's it will smoke a lot because it is rounded and it will also blow out the hole. It really is quite dangerous to use a steel drill bit on wood because you could cause the wood to catch on fire. You should always use a wooden drill bit for wood but if you must use a steel bit make sure you have coolant attached and flowing through the holes in the drill. HTH.
There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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#14
  So I've got these drill bits Stwood_ that my grandfather ...
What you get when using regular twist drills on wood is that they don't clear the chips like a wood drill can. They can get compacted into the flutes, especially in wood like pine that has resin that melts when it gets hot. Then you are spinning this mess of hot compacted pine chips inside the hole. Like a native tribesman making fire with a spinning stick.



A sharp bit will help, and easing off the drilling, lifting out and letting the chips clear may be necessary. .

To prevent blowout as you exit the wood either drill into a backing board, or drill a small pilot hole right though. Then drill 1/2 way with your full size bit, flip the wood over, and drill again from the other side.
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#15
  So I've got these drill bits Stwood_ that my grandfather ...
If you have a bench grinder you could sharpen the likely dull bits. It's not hard to learn how. They'll cut better in everything afterwards.

John
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#16
  So I've got these drill bits Stwood_ that my grandfather ...
If you were to drill a pilot hole though and then half way with the full size drill then when you turned the board over you would need a subland drill or a step drill with the correct sizes in order to be accurately aligned with the previously drilled holes. As for sharpening such a drill it would be best to have it professionally done. If you try to do it yourself you run the risk of changing the geometry of the drill and causing it do drag in the hole once again smoking the work and possibly even setting it afire like the mentioned caveman or indian.
There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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#17
  So I've got these drill bits Stwood_ that my grandfather ...



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#18
  Re: So I've got these drill bits barnowl [img]/ssl_proxy.php...
The bit that barn showed is the one you want for drilling holes for dowels.The advise for sharpening a bit if you had a grinder is good ,a sharp bit is better then a dull one but that point on there is not a good one for wood and as for changing the configuration ,that is what you want to do as drill bits are sharpened for the job intended,such as metal,plastic ,etc.So if you don't get it right and you go to drilling some metal it will not cut,just keep trying to sharpen it and you will eventually get to learn on how to do it. As for taking it to a professional ,well ok but not to worry as you will learn how to sharpen it. Some bits are actually even sharpened to drill off center.This falls in the category of the right tool for the job.

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#19
  Re: So I've got these drill bits bgosh The bit that barn sh...
That brad point is just what you need for drilling metal. That being because metal is hard compared to wood and the drill doesn't easily bite into the metal so "skating" is an issue but with wood the drill bit can be pressed into the wood so that it doesn't "skate".
There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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#20
  Re: So I've got these drill bits Redman That brad point is j...
A brad point bit is not for drilling metal ,it is for wood and yes it is very good for keeping it in line and for getting started. Center point drills are for metal.

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#21
  Re: So I've got these drill bits Redman That brad point is j...
Redman said:


That brad point is just what you need for drilling metal. That being because metal is hard compared to wood and the drill doesn't easily bite into the metal so "skating" is an issue but with wood the drill bit can be pressed into the wood so that it doesn't "skate".




Brad Point Drill Bits are not for drilling metal but primarily used for wood. The spur cutting edges reduce splintering and ensure a smooth, clean hole.
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So I've got these drill bits


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