#12
  
We have a kenmore dryer that doesn't get hot.  I have replaced the cycling thermostat and overtemp sensor a couple of times now, and I also replaced the heating element because they are cheap.  Wife just told me it stopped heating again.

After the first replacement overheat sensor blew, I checked the ducting and dryer for excess lint.  It certainly seems to be pumping enough air out of the vent.  

Anything else I should be checking?
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#13
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
(11-22-2018, 03:31 PM)EricU Wrote: We have a kenmore dryer that doesn't get hot.  I have replaced the cycling thermostat and overtemp sensor a couple of times now, and I also replaced the heating element because they are cheap.  Wife just told me it stopped heating again.

After the first replacement overheat sensor blew, I checked the ducting and dryer for excess lint.  It certainly seems to be pumping enough air out of the vent.  

Anything else I should be checking?

The only other thing I can think of is the timer.   Put a voltmeter on it and see if the element is getting voltage or where it is losing voltage.   Look at the timer and see if anything looks like it is burnt or has been overheated.   Roly
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#14
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
(11-22-2018, 03:31 PM)EricU Wrote: We have a kenmore dryer that doesn't get hot.  I have replaced the cycling thermostat and overtemp sensor a couple of times now, and I also replaced the heating element because they are cheap.  Wife just told me it stopped heating again.

After the first replacement overheat sensor blew, I checked the ducting and dryer for excess lint.  It certainly seems to be pumping enough air out of the vent.  

Anything else I should be checking?

Have you also checked the vent outside the house? Is it clogged or stuck closed?
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#15
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
Is there a second lint collection area? On my Fisher Paykel dryer we kept tripping the overheat sensor (resettable, thankfully) but a different forum mentioned that behind the main lint trap was a second smaller one. I found it had filled over the years and once cleaned out the problem went away.
Like yours, we had seemingly plenty of air flow but was still tripping. No idea if yours is the same or not.
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#16
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
the vent outside is actually stuck open.  I'm really regretting not replacing it when I worked on the wall in that area, now it's going to be a lot more difficult.  I have considered the idea that there are critters in there. I disassembled most of the indoor ducting last month, but it takes a bend as it exits the house and that's not easy to check.

I was going to disassemble some cowling on the dryer.  I vaguely recall that the first time the overheat tripped years ago, there was lint built up in there.




There is a heat level control on the front panel.  Not sure how that affects the operation.  I suppose that is the main suspect now if lint build-up isn't the problem.  

I'm seriously considering getting a ventless dryer.  Wife likes the idea.  This one is getting to be at least a decade old. I know they should last longer than that, but the appliance manufacturers don't seem to agree.
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#17
  RE: it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU the vent outside is ...
(11-23-2018, 03:21 PM)EricU Wrote: the vent outside is actually stuck open.  I'm really regretting not replacing it when I worked on the wall in that area, now it's going to be a lot more difficult.  I have considered the idea that there are critters in there.  I disassembled most of the indoor ducting last month, but it takes a bend as it exits the house and that's not easy to check.

I was going to disassemble some cowling on the dryer.  I vaguely recall that the first time the overheat tripped years ago, there was lint built up in there.




There is a heat level control on the front panel.  Not sure how that affects the operation.  I suppose that is the main suspect now if lint build-up isn't the problem.  

I'm seriously considering getting a ventless dryer.  Wife likes the idea.  This one is getting to be at least a decade old. I know they should last longer than that, but the appliance manufacturers don't seem to agree.

Can you see if air is coming out while it is running ?  With it being stuck open there could be a nest in there. If it does not blow outside disconnect the duct at the back of the dryer and see if it blows out there.  Roly
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#18
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
yes, it blows air outside.  It feels fairly strong, but that doesn't mean there isn't a blockage
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#19
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
I recently replaced my duct hose with solid duct tubing.  I had planned on using small sheet  metal screws to join the sections, but my on line research showed that to be an error.  The screw tips trap lint.  

The recommendation is to use aluminum tape. 

So if you are planning on replacing the duct hose, do it with solid section tubing and no screws.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#20
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
I have been looking at the vent system trying to make it better.  I thought it was pretty good, but I might have made it worse when I insulated near the exit from the house. Looking at the ventless dryers, the condensation ones don't appeal and the heat pump dryers are new and aren't going to be in stock anywhere anytime soon. I'm a bit afraid to try new appliance tech, particularly if it's expensive. They really do a poor job of building things nowadays.

the vent system is almost all solid metal duct, and I don't think there are any screws.  I think I'm going to tear out the wall and put a periscope there in place of the flex tubing that is there now.  Then replace the outside vent with something better, if I can figure out what that is.  I'm thinking about swapping the location of the dryer to be closer to the outside wall so that the duct is shorter. Pretty sure the washer hoses will move that far. Maybe put the dryer on a pedestal too, since that will make the vent shorter and also make it even with the washer.

I tore out the shroud around the fan on the dryer. It looked to be operating okay. I suppose it could be stripped and still move with the test that I did, but that seems remote. There was some lint in there, but not enough to cause a problem.
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#21
  it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly EricU We have a kenmore dr...
On a related note regarding dryers..... if you have not seen these
vent connectors from Lee Valley, you really should check them out.

Cuts WAY down on the length of flex tubing needed to go from the
dryer to the wall.  Like to about a foot or less in my case. HUGE
improvement.  Not inexpensive, but this is one of those head slapping
"why did I not do this sooner" kinda expenses.  

http://www.leevalley.com/us/garden/page....2194,67373
Mark Singleton

Bene Vivere Quam Optima Est Ultio
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it's always something, dryer overheating repeatedly


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