#15
  
Hello, everyone,

I currently cut groove for my boxes with a table saw or a router. I recently saw an episode of The Woodwright’s Shop where Roy used a plow plane to cut grooves for a box and made it look easy and fun. Of course, Roy makes a lot of things look easy and fun that I suspect aren’t actually, so I thought I would ask for people’s opinion of using a plow plane in general, and specifically opinions on the Lee Valley plow plane. I noticed that Roy was making his grooves in softwood, so I would be interested in how easy it is to groove hardwood with the LV plane.

Also, would anyone recommend Lee Valley’s combination plane or the plow plane? It’s more expensive, of course, but it seems like it more versatile. I think grooves would be my major use of the plane, but I would have the option of expanding my woodworking hand plane skills. If it is substantially harder to set up and use the combination plane for grooves I would probably stick with the plow plane.

Thanks in advance for your opinions.

Hank Gillette
Hank Gillette
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#16
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
Hank,  I can't speak to the LV plow or combination planes,  since I haven't handled them, but in general LV makes a great product.  When I am doing -short dados or rabbits,  I usually reach for my Stanley 45.  It makes quick work.  I don't have a dado stack cutter for the table saw, and getting the right bit, and setting the fence for the router table takes a little time.  The 45 isn't any quicker, but it is not much longer, and is much quieter and more satisfying to use.  Also, the 45 is a little easier to get the dado in exactly the right place, since you can see where it as as you make your first cut - for me, the router table set up is a little harder, since the first pass on the rt is about 1/8 deep, and by then it is too late to correct. With the 45, the first pass may be a few thousands, and you can make an adjustment and not even see the first pass.
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#17
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
Groove in hardwood is very easy. Especially when you choose your grain direction wisely.  The small plough from LV is perfect for doing it. Unless you get a fantastic example of a stanley, and are able to tune it, you'll be better off with the new one from LV.
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#18
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
hmmm...
   
Hmmm..
.
   
YMMV...
   
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#19
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
(07-09-2019, 08:00 PM)hankgillette Wrote: Hello, everyone,

I currently cut groove for my boxes with a table saw or a router. I recently saw an episode of The Woodwright’s Shop where Roy used a plow plane to cut grooves for a box and made it look easy and fun. Of course, Roy makes a lot of things look easy and fun that I suspect aren’t actually, so I thought I would ask for people’s opinion of using a plow plane in general, and specifically opinions on the Lee Valley plow plane. I noticed that Roy was making his grooves in softwood, so I would be interested in how easy it is to groove hardwood with the LV plane.

Also, would anyone recommend Lee Valley’s combination plane or the plow plane? It’s more expensive, of course, but it seems like it more versatile. I think grooves would be my major use of the plane, but I would have the option of expanding my woodworking hand plane skills. If it is substantially harder to set up and use the combination plane for grooves I would probably stick with the plow plane.

Thanks in advance for your opinions.

Hank Gillette

Hi Hank

I have both the Veritas Small Plow and the Combination Plane. Keep in mind that I was part of the team testing these pre-production, so that is my bias. Nevertheless, these are superior planes and there is nothing on the new market that comes close. A vintage Stanley #45 is an excellent plane, however it is not in the same category quality-wise. The Stanley is much cheaper and capable of being tuned to work as well. It just depends where you are coming from - wanting to start with a new and high quality plane vs willing to restore an old one.

I have posted a number of articles on these planes: 

1. Making dados (comparing 3 planes): http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews...dados.html

2. Making grooves: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews...ooves.html

But to directly demonstrate an answer to your question about grooves and hard wood, this is an extract from my recent post on the Harlequin table ...

The making of the drawer slips may have some interest. I used Tasmanian Blue Gum (because it links to the drawer bottoms). This is quite interlocked and any planing with a plough to form either grooves or beads would be expected to end unhappily, with much tear out. I have posted this tip before: add a 15 degree back bevel to all plough blades to create a high 60 degree cutting angle.


The 3/16" beads were ploughed with the Veritas Combination Plane ...




Brilliant finish ...




... and a 1/8" groove for the rebate in the drawer bottom was ploughed by the Veritas Small Plow ...




Again, tearout free ...






Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#20
  RE: Plow Planes Derek Cohen [quote='hankgillette...
(07-10-2019, 02:15 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Hi Hank

I have both the Veritas Small Plow and the Combination Plane. Keep in mind that I was part of the team testing these pre-production, so that is my bias. Nevertheless, these are superior planes and there is nothing on the new market that comes close. A vintage Stanley #45 is an excellent plane, however it is not in the same category quality-wise. The Stanley is much cheaper and capable of being tuned to work as well. It just depends where you are coming from - wanting to start with a new and high quality plane vs willing to restore an old one.

I have posted a number of articles on these planes: 

1. Making dados (comparing 3 planes): http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews...dados.html

2. Making grooves: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews...ooves.html

But to directly demonstrate an answer to your question about grooves and hard wood, this is an extract from my recent post on the Harlequin table ...

The making of the drawer slips may have some interest. I used Tasmanian Blue Gum (because it links to the drawer bottoms). This is quite interlocked and any planing with a plough to form either grooves or beads would be expected to end unhappily, with much tear out. I have posted this tip before: add a 15 degree back bevel to all plough blades to create a high 60 degree cutting angle.


The 3/16" beads were ploughed with the Veritas Combination Plane ...




Brilliant finish ...




... and a 1/8" groove for the rebate in the drawer bottom was ploughed by the Veritas Small Plow ...




Again, tearout free ...






Regards from Perth

Derek

Derek,

Did you round off the edges on the LV cimbo plane tote-looks much more comfortable (and traditional!). Nice job on the beading, too!

T.Z.
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
http://www.metaltech-pm.com
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#21
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
Hi Tony

My Combo plane is a pre-production version. The handle may differ, although I doubt it. Perhaps it is the angle, or you are comparing it to the smaller Small Plow.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#22
  RE: Plow Planes Derek Cohen Hi Tony My Combo ...
(07-10-2019, 07:47 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Hi Tony

My Combo plane is a pre-production version. The handle may differ, although I doubt it. Perhaps it is the angle, or you are comparing it to the smaller Small Plow.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Derek:  Were you using the new Veritas irons, or vintage Stanley?  And do you think that would make a difference, if either were properly sharpened?
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#23
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
I was using Veritas PM-V11 blades.

I have used Stanley #45 and #46 blades, and they are good steel. A big factor is the Veritas blades need no preparation at all.

Here's a tip for those with a Record #43: these Veritas blades are magic in this little plane. Use the 1/8", 3/16" and 1/4".

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#24
  Plow Planes hankgillette Hello, everyone, ...
(07-09-2019, 08:00 PM)hankgillette Wrote: Hello, everyone,

I currently cut groove for my boxes with a table saw or a router. I recently saw an episode of The Woodwright’s Shop where Roy used a plow plane to cut grooves for a box and made it look easy and fun. Of course, Roy makes a lot of things look easy and fun that I suspect aren’t actually, so I thought I would ask for people’s opinion of using a plow plane in general, and specifically opinions on the Lee Valley plow plane. I noticed that Roy was making his grooves in softwood, so I would be interested in how easy it is to groove hardwood with the LV plane.

Also, would anyone recommend Lee Valley’s combination plane or the plow plane? It’s more expensive, of course, but it seems like it more versatile. I think grooves would be my major use of the plane, but I would have the option of expanding my woodworking hand plane skills. If it is substantially harder to set up and use the combination plane for grooves I would probably stick with the plow plane.

Thanks in advance for your opinions.

Hank Gillette

If I could afford Lee Valley I would get it. I got a 45 instead. Once you get up on the learning curve and cuss it for a while it becomes a lot of fun.



Carl
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