#12
  
Am I the only one who didn't do this before? I've always use acid brushes from HF for glues, some stains and the like and they work okay. But recently I wanted to test a finish and rather than grab a regular brush I used an acid brush I could throw away. WOW. I loved it. It's a natural bristle brush and the finish went on smoothly and there was no problem with too much on the brush. I've now used it for a bunch of picture frames and I don't think I'm ever going back to a 1inch brush. Also cleanup! A couple of tablespoons of whatever and it's clean. I've even trimed it to an an angle when needed with no guilt attached of ruining a "good" brush. So versatile.

Why do nobody tell me this? Why?
Was living the good retired life on the Lake. Now just living retired.
Reply

#13
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
Acid brush or Chip brush?
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
Reply
#14
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
I love acid brushes for glue and some other things, but the bristles tend to easily fall out, which precludes me using them much for finishing.  If I need a smaller, detail brush, I use an artist's brush.  The bristles are much finer and don't fall out as readily.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
Reply
#15
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
I've used acid brushes to work stain (glaze) into corners as a way of "aging" a piece. Also dark wax since the bristles are stiff.

And yes, they do fall out. But not wet finishes so no big thing to pick out the escaped bristles.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#16
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
Yes we are talking about the acid brush. The metal handle 1/2 wide horse hair brush. I've not had many bristles fall out. I tried to brush them vigorously first to try to lessen that problem.  An unsung hero in the shop.  (I use the chip brushes too but that's another post)
Was living the good retired life on the Lake. Now just living retired.
Reply
#17
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
What finish type are you using?   That could make a big difference.
Reply
#18
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
I've used them with water based finish and oil based. Works well for both. Not so good with paint.
Was living the good retired life on the Lake. Now just living retired.
Reply
#19
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
I will usually take a pair of scissors and trim the bristles to fit the job better.

Mostly, I hammer the metal ferrel flat to prevent the fibers from coming out, then trim the end to an angled cut and trim off the errant fibers.
Reply

#20
  RE: In praise of the lowly acid brush Scoony I will usually take ...
(08-14-2019, 09:57 PM)Scoony Wrote: I will usually take a pair of scissors and trim the bristles to fit the job better.

Mostly, I hammer the metal ferrel flat to prevent the fibers from coming out, then trim the end to an angled cut and trim off the errant fibers.

+1
Reply
#21
  In praise of the lowly acid brush Eurekan Am I the only one wh...
I've used them for years to spread glue on 3/4 wide material. Especially when assembling rail and stile doors.
Keep a small can of water there nearby. When done, drop the brush in the can and then later rinse it out and use it again.
Steve





Working on 20,000 Winkgrin





Reply
In praise of the lowly acid brush


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)