#15
  
Looking for some input on the Bombe chest I am building (link to original thread) https://forums.woodnet.net/showthread.php?tid=7352013

 I am starting to mill the drawer sides (Maple) for the curved sections of the Bombe case. As far as end-grain orientation which of the two options do you think would work better (i.e. cause less trouble long-term). Direction of concentric growth rings “opposite” the case curve (Option 1) ; or growth rings generally concentric with the case side (Option 2)? Main issue I am hoping to avoids obviously is “cupping”.  

I am thinking Option 1 since any cupping would move away from the case side (potentially minimizing binding).

On the other hand, I may be overthinking this. Since, the sides will be joined with dovetails into the drawer front and rear which would limit any cupping I am not sure this is a huge deal. Working with Maple in the past for drawer sides in my experience it has always been pretty stable. Any experience/thoughts on this is appreciated.


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#16
  Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input Don_M Looking for some inp...
My thoughts (based on no experience) is that your choice (#1) makes sense, but I also think you may be over thinking it. The drawer joinery should certainly contain any movement. Option #1 does seem to provide some comfort against Murphy and his infernal law.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#17
  RE: Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input fredhargis My thoughts (based o...
Dave Diaman likely knows the correct approach.  With zero experience making this type of drawer but plenty of "normal" ones, I don't think it matters as the joinery will keep it from moving much.  But when in doubt I look for quarter sawn wood.  

John
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#18
  Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input Don_M Looking for some inp...
I am not expert by any means.
I've been taught the wood reacts to moisture by straightening the growth rings.

If that is true option #2 would tend to straighten (cup) towards the center of the drawer (i.e. away from the side) thus not binding.

I'm likely missing something ...

Although I'm of the opinion that the dovetail joinery front/rear will contain the movement sufficiently.
~Dan.
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#19
  RE: Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input Dan Moening I am not expert by a...
(02-09-2020, 12:38 PM)Dan Moening Wrote: I am not expert by any means.
I've been taught the wood reacts to moisture by straightening the growth rings.

If that is true option #2 would tend to straighten (cup) towards the center of the drawer (i.e. away from the side) thus not binding.

I'm likely missing something ...

Although I'm of the opinion that the dovetail joinery front/rear will contain the movement sufficiently.

Dan - I believe you are absolutely  correct. Cups in the "opposite" direction the growth rings - so number 2 would generally cup inward. But I tend to agree with all of the respondents that dovetail  joinery on the front and rear of the drawer will likely stabilize any movement. Thanks
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#20
  Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input Don_M Looking for some inp...
Drawer sides are typically quarter grain to minimize wood movement. That doesn't help if you already have face grain. Which way do you want to shave to correct when they move into a pinch?
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#21
  RE: Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input hbmcc Drawer sides are typ...
(02-11-2020, 01:47 PM)hbmcc Wrote: Drawer sides are typically quarter grain to minimize wood movement. That doesn't help if you already have face grain. Which way do you want to shave to correct when they move into a pinch?

I usually use 1/4-sawn Anegre for drawer sides - but I couldn't get it any larger than 4/4 from my local supplier. I needed  6/4 (or thicker) material due to the curvature of the drawer sides. Maple was plentiful locally and I have used it many times with good results - so I went with that.
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Bombe Adventure - Need Some Input


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