#12
  
Anyone here have experience with transition pieces for outside drywall corners?  I'm talking something that looks like this:

[Image: lYtDyy7.jpeg]

Basically, we're looking at replacing the base board trim at the same time we do the flooring, and going with a taller trim piece - more like 5", instead of the ~1.5" we currently have.  Trying to figure out the least painful way to put new corner transitions in... basically everywhere in the house.

From what I gather, when this house was done ~20 years ago, they probably just cut a section of square corner bead, and then used mud to do the bevel.  Nowadays, there are pre-made pieces to speed that process a bit.  Either way, it seems like we'd have to do a fair bit of re-mudding, sanding, priming, etc. and then blend the texture and paint with the rest of the wall... at every single outside corner.  Not really liking that notion, TBH.

I've done the 'wrapped' miter, with double 22.5 degree miters, at the last house.  Kind of a PITA in its own way, so I'm not a huge fan of that route - though to be fair, that was an older house that was exceedingly not square in any given dimension, which probably made things worse than normal.

Is there a less painful way to get the first look above, without redoing half the wall in the process?
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#13
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
Since your pic doesn’t show up, I’ll have to guess. I have bullnose corners and my baseboards wrap those. Originally, they had the miters, but since I made custom trim, I thought I’d make things a little more interesting. I turned a cylinder with a hole the same radius as the bullnose. I then turned the matching profile of the baseboard into the cylinder. To make a perfect match, I used the router bit as a template.
I then cut the cylinder into four equal sections. The first try wasn’t the best, but I improved quickly and eventually got a nice fit around the bullnose. The ends of the straight runs just butted up to curved sections. A little fine tuning with some sandpaper and they looked great. The grain does run perpendicular, but it doesn’t bother me at all and this is for unpainted trim.

Of course, I could be guessing wrong on what you’re asking about.
VH07V  
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#14
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
We just use metal corner bead and nail it and mud it
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#15
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
Updated the top post, this time with a working pic Wink
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#16
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
In my opinion that looks like hell. The bullnose should be run to the floor. The trim is then easily measured and marked with Rockler’s Bench Dog Bullnose Trim Gauge.
Any free advice given is worth double price paid.
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#17
  RE: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square Woodenfish In my opinion that l...
(06-28-2020, 12:59 PM)Woodenfish Wrote: In my opinion that looks like hell. The bullnose should be run to the floor. The trim is then easily measured and marked with Rockler’s Bench Dog Bullnose Trim Gauge.

In my opinion, those bullnose corners should be outlawed.   Sarcasm
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#18
  RE: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square Woodenfish In my opinion that l...
(06-28-2020, 12:59 PM)Woodenfish Wrote: The trim is then easily measured and marked with Rockler’s Bench Dog Bullnose Trim Gauge.

Well, that does look like it'd remove a lot of the PITA factor I had at the last house doing that kind of trim.
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#19
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
Those drywall corners used to be readily available here in plastic, 90 on the bottom for the base (5"??), and rounded above.

It's been 15 years since I've seen/used them so maybe they have fell out of style and not available everywhere?
Steve





 
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#20
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
My friend's parents' home had bull nose drywall (or maybe real plaster, I'm not sure).  This was in Sands Point, New York where homes go for millions of dollars.  The baseboard trim was radiused to match the drywall. 

I don't know that helps any though, because that would be an expensive way to go.

I think I  would cut out the  section and nail in a 1-1/2" block of wood with an angle cut at the top.  Make this taller than the molding.  Use grain filler or mud on the cut end so you don't pick up texture.   Then add the molding.
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#21
  Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square nuk Anyone here have exp...
There is a product here: squarzit

That being said, I've been in the process of removing bullnose corners entirely in my house.  I'm installing new baseboard and crown molding, and like a traditional style, so the bullnose has to go.  I personally hate the wrap around or multi-mitered baseboard, and would use the squarzit if I wasn't removing the bullnose.
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Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square


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