#9
  
I was originally planning on re-facing my cabinets, but the boxes are low-quality builder grade and I think they should be replaced too.

I will be building 32mm euro-style (no face frame) cabinets.  Except for the end cabinets, only the narrow veneer on the boxes' edges require a finish that matches the doors.   All the cabinet doors will be shaker style painted.

I will be using Blum full overlay hinges.  So only a narrow sliver of the boxes will show (and the exposed end panels).

Options: 

1.  Buy 3/4" ply unfinished.  Paint the box interior, exterior, and edge veneer. 

2.  Buy 3/4" ply, interior finished clear.  Paint the exterior and edge veneer.

3.  Buy 3/4" ply, finished both sides.  Paint the edge veneer and any exposed side panels.


The third option appeals to me.  It reduces the amount of work and shortens my build time.

Questions:

1.  How to paint the edge veneer.  I have a 4-stage HVLP sprayer.  But masking everything to spray the veneer seems like a chore.  Do I just pick up a brush and paint the edge veneer?

2.  How to paint the exposed side panels.  Will I have adhesion issues with the paint over the factory clear finish?  Do I scuff the factory finish and apply a primer?  I usually use 1-2-3, would that work on the factory finish?

Thanks for your input.

Cooler
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#10
  cabinet painting strategy Cooler I was originally pla...
(01-12-2021, 09:32 AM)Cooler Wrote: I was originally planning on re-facing my cabinets, but the boxes are low-quality builder grade and I think they should be replaced too.

I will be building 32mm euro-style (no face frame) cabinets.  Except for the end cabinets, only the narrow veneer on the boxes' edges require a finish that matches the doors.   All the cabinet doors will be shaker style painted.

I will be using Blum full overlay hinges.  So only a narrow sliver of the boxes will show (and the exposed end panels).

Options: 

1.  Buy 3/4" ply unfinished.  Paint the box interior, exterior, and edge veneer. 

2.  Buy 3/4" ply, interior finished clear.  Paint the exterior and edge veneer.

3.  Buy 3/4" ply, finished both sides.  Paint the edge veneer and any exposed side panels.


The third option appeals to me.  It reduces the amount of work and shortens my build time.

Questions:

1.  How to paint the edge veneer.  I have a 4-stage HVLP sprayer.  But masking everything to spray the veneer seems like a chore.  Do I just pick up a brush and paint the edge veneer?

2.  How to paint the exposed side panels.  Will I have adhesion issues with the paint over the factory clear finish?  Do I scuff the factory finish and apply a primer?  I usually use 1-2-3, would that work on the factory finish?

Thanks for your input.

Cooler

Not totally following when you say “Paint the edge veneer and any exposed side panels”. Are you planning on applying a veneer to the edges (ie. Such as “Band-It or similar)? If so what is the need for painting the edges. As for as the boxes I would use Cross (or “X”) band grade plywood with an applied melamine veneer. It is a furniture grade plywood with a clean look and saves a lot of time as far as finishing any interior/exposed exterior surfaces.
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#11
  cabinet painting strategy Cooler I was originally pla...
I assume you've totally eliminated melamine, right?

If they are white, you can use white edge banding it would match it close enough not to be noticeable.

Or you can buy different colored edge banding here is one place I don't know if they will sell to you tho.

You should be able to sand and prime over the poly with a good quality primer.

Another option for end panels (I like better) is to attach a door panel.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
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#12
  cabinet painting strategy Cooler I was originally pla...
I would use prefinished one side plywood.  There's no need to finish the outside panels of cabinets that get screwed together.  But if you feel the need to do something, just because, just wipe or brush on a coat of shellac.  

You can easily paint the veneer edge tape by hand, no need to spray.  Mask off where needed and use a foam brush or roller.  ProClassic and Emerald Urethane Trim paint self level very well, especially if you thin them a little and/or add a little Extender.  

I would add a separate end panel to cover the exposed ends.  That way you can use whatever material you want and, equally important, you can spray them.  Screw them in place from inside the cabinet.  

BIN shellac based white primer is far better than 1-2-3.

John
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#13
  cabinet painting strategy Cooler I was originally pla...
I used Emerald (dark color) and a week later it still feels soft.  It sprayed nicely, but undiluted the brushstrokes on a sample board were objectionable and did not self level.  

I've only used Breakthrough! (PPG) in white but it got hard after a few hours.

I think I will go with coated one side.  Roller on Bin or 123 on the hidden sides.  Spray the exposed side with Breakthrough! and brush the edges with Breakthrough!

Breakthrough dries in about 20 minutes and can be re-coated in an hour or two (depending upon the temperature and humidity).  It can be put into service in 6 hours with no blocking (sticking together of painted surfaces--I only recently learned that term).
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#14
  RE: cabinet painting strategy Cooler I used Emerald (dark...
(01-13-2021, 09:57 AM)Cooler Wrote: I used Emerald (dark color) and a week later it still feels soft.  It sprayed nicely, but undiluted the brushstrokes on a sample board were objectionable and did not self level.  

I've only used Breakthrough! (PPG) in white but it got hard after a few hours.

I think I will go with coated one side.  Roller on Bin or 123 on the hidden sides.  Spray the exposed side with Breakthrough! and brush the edges with Breakthrough!

Breakthrough dries in about 20 minutes and can be re-coated in an hour or two (depending upon the temperature and humidity).  It can be put into service in 6 hours with no blocking (sticking together of painted surfaces--I only recently learned that term).

Not Emerald - -  Emerald Urethane Trim paint.  

Never used Breakthrough but would if it were more easily available.  

John
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#15
  RE: cabinet painting strategy jteneyck [quote='Cooler' pid=...
(01-13-2021, 08:28 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Not Emerald - -  Emerald Urethane Trim paint.  

Never used Breakthrough but would if it were more easily available.  

John
I will have to check the can to see which I got.  I told him it was for cabinets.  I would hope he would select the right paint.
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