#12
  
I'm planning on making a long distance move to relocate and am starting to become concerned about how much wood I have to move. In WBLM log and burl sections I'm over 1000 lb. I have other large pieces of wood and well as many turning squares and dimensional lumber.

I'm concerned that hiring a moving company to deal with this may become quite expensive. I'm looking for any suggestions and tips as to how to get it all moved. So far my best idea is to put it in storage until I have to move then just rent a moving van and put it in storage until I find permanent housing.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
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#13
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
If you have a truck, you can rent a one-way trailer to tow to the new location. If you need an enclosed space then you may be better off with a one-way trick. Compare those costs to the value of the wood. You might just be better off selling it.
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#14
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
Is it irreplaceable stock?  Does it have some sentimental value, like it came from a dear family member's property?

You're right that professional movers would get some nice coin to move it.  Even renting a truck would be relatively expensive.  Then you have the storage costs.

Doing it yourself is the least costly option...but...that's another thing to do during a very busy operation.

There is one other way.  There are long-haul freight lines who will let you load part of a trailer and they'll haul it to the destination of your choice.  ( Estes Freight, for example)  I really don't know their rate structures but at least one advertises to be cheaper than truck rental.  There's things to consider like having to be at the loadout because you do it yourself, and having to be at the delivery, because you do it yourself.  Another added set of tasks during your move.
 
Unless I was certain it was one-of-a-kind-never-to-be-seen-again stock, I think I'd sell it and put those dollars into stocking the next place.  Moving like that is stressful enough.
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#15
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
Have you thought about POD's? They cost more than truck rentals, but are easy to load, and can store them (for a monthly fee) until you are ready for it.
S.E. Alabama, formerly from Wisconsin.
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#16
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
I though your plan is a good one, but once someone mentioned PODS (or one of the copycat services like that) it struck me that might be a far better choice. Of curse, that's if the lumber value exceeds the cost of dealing with the move.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#17
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
Much of the stock would be prohibitively expensive to replace; a 57 lb slab of amboyna burl, pommele sapele lumber, african blackwood burl log sections, 100+ lb WBLM burl sections, etc. Some common stuff I can sell like walnut or pieces like my 27" wide western walnut slabs that I may not get around to using, though they can never be replaced.

I thought of PODS but that only works where they can deliver, that in my case is far outside their locations.

Sounds like self move is the best price and flexibility.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
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#18
  RE: Need tips on moving lumber SteveS Much of the stock wo...
I looked at UShip when I wanted to move a 1600 lb jointer from MI to NY.  It seems like the folks who actually move your stuff are freelancers and UShip is just the broker, but their rates were very attractive.  I didn't trust any of them with being able to load or unload the jointer safely but that wouldn't be a concern for a load of lumber.  

John
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#19
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
If you can palletize the lumber, you might be able to find a trucker deadheading somewhere near your new location who might be able to deliver it for a reasonable fee. Any colleges/universities near your new location that might have students in your area looking to get their stuff there or vice versa, that you can make a deal to share the cost of the truck.  Military transfers might also be considered for cost sharing
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#20
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
(01-23-2021, 08:18 PM)SteveS Wrote: I'm planning on making a long distance move to relocate and am starting to become concerned about how much wood I have to move. In WBLM log and burl sections I'm over 1000 lb. I have other large pieces of wood and well as many turning squares and dimensional lumber.

I'm concerned that hiring a moving company to deal with this may become quite expensive. I'm looking for any suggestions and tips as to how to get it all moved. So far my best idea is to put it in storage until I have to move then just rent a moving van and put it in storage until I find permanent housing.

I moved from Richland, Wa to Huntsville 6 months ago, My move as a POO move so it was paid for by my company, however I rented a uhaul trailer and moved about 600+ bf of lumber, sold the rest.  In all I had in the trailer about 2500 lbs.  Worked like a champ driving across Kansas and Nabraska its probably the only thing keeping me on the road we has some severe crosswinds.

By the way where are you moving to?
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#21
  Need tips on moving lumber SteveS I'm planning on maki...
Many Army officers I've met in my career have done their moves using ABF.  The company delivers a trailer in front of your house and you load it.  I would load the lumber flat on the floor and then my household goods on top of that.  When you're done, they come back lock a false wall across the back of your stuff and they move it to your next location.  I believe they charge by how much of the trailer you utilize.  They will use any empty space behind what you load.
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