#12
Thinking of either upgrading my Dewalt 735 planer to a Shelix OEM cutter head, or just buying a new and larger (1 1/2 - 3 HP) planer with a helical cutter head.  My Dewalt is only a couple of years old and I don't have any issues with it.  I want to spend some money on this part of woodworking (dimensioning wood) to make it easier and faster cause I don't really like it all that much.  I use a planer sled and plane both sides of a board as I find I can do a better job than if I joint one side and then plane the other - so I spend a fair amount of time on that machine and willing to spend a little money to make it easier if possible.  On the other hand, I am a hobbyist with a shop in my basement so I don't want overkill either.  Any thoughts on the decision - upgrade the Dewalt vs spring for a new planer?  Thanks as always...FPT
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#13
(03-01-2021, 10:32 PM)fptahoe Wrote: Thinking of either upgrading my Dewalt 735 planer to a Shelix OEM cutter head, or just buying a new and larger (1 1/2 - 3 HP) planer with a helical cutter head.  My Dewalt is only a couple of years old and I don't have any issues with it.  I want to spend some money on this part of woodworking (dimensioning wood) to make it easier and faster cause I don't really like it all that much.  I use a planer sled and plane both sides of a board as I find I can do a better job than if I joint one side and then plane the other - so I spend a fair amount of time on that machine and willing to spend a little money to make it easier if possible.  On the other hand, I am a hobbyist with a shop in my basement so I don't want overkill either.  Any thoughts on the decision - upgrade the Dewalt vs spring for a new planer?  Thanks as always...FPT

No offense, but you should spend some time to figure out why you are having problems face jointing.  Using a planer sled is inefficient compared to using a jointer for that task. You'd spend less time prepping stock and use the planer less.  Personally, I wouldn't put a spiral head on a lunchbox planer.  If I wanted that feature I'd get a new planer, but I'd first think about getting a drum sander instead.  That gives you a way to deal with tearout when required, plus so much more.  

John
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#14
(03-01-2021, 10:49 PM)jteneyck Wrote: No offense, but you should spend some time to figure out why you are having problems face jointing.  Using a planer sled is inefficient compared to using a jointer for that task. You'd spend less time prepping stock and use the planer less.  Personally, I wouldn't put a spiral head on a lunchbox planer.  If I wanted that feature I'd get a new planer, but I'd first think about getting a drum sander instead.  That gives you a way to deal with tearout when required, plus so much more.  

John

I can face joint, but my jointer is small (6") and has a short bed.  So my process is plane both sides of the board - yes it sounds inefficient but it works for me.  And then I just edge joint one side and cut it parallel with the table saw.  I can get boards panel-glue-ready this way.  So with the equipment I have, that is the best process for me.  So why not get a new jointer?  I think I probably will.  I just can't wait to get done dimensioning wood to really get started on the part of woodworking (everything else) I enjoy more.  Appreciate the input, as always.
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#15
(03-01-2021, 11:07 PM)fptahoe Wrote: I can face joint, but my jointer is small (6") and has a short bed.  So my process is plane both sides of the board - yes it sounds inefficient but it works for me.  And then I just edge joint one side and cut it parallel with the table saw.  I can get boards panel-glue-ready this way.  So with the equipment I have, that is the best process for me.  So why not get a new jointer?  I think I probably will.  I just can't wait to get done dimensioning wood to really get started on the part of woodworking (everything else) I enjoy more.  Appreciate the input, as always.

Yeah, I often forget lots of folks have small jointers.  If you only build cabinets with sheet goods and only have to make face frames and door stiles and rails they are fine, but once you want to build solid wood cabinets their limitation becomes painfully obvious.  Your work around is the best you can do - for the moment - but I'd be looking to upgrade to a wider and longer jointer, and I would do that before buying another planer.  Or I'd sell both the jointer and planer you now have and get a combo unit.  I started with a 10" Inca J/P.  It had incredibly short tables but I regularly jointed stuff 6 ft and longer w/o much problem.  What it had going for it was 10" of jointing capacity.  I used it for 25 years, but eventually found a used 14" MiniMax J/P with tables twice as long.  Soooo much better and it takes up less space than separate machines, too.  I work in a basement shop with only stair access.  It can be done.

John
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#16
Given the choices, I think you'll be way ahead with a stationary planer (assuming you can get it into the basement and have the electrical for it). Just the reduced noise will be worth it.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#17
There are lots of videos on youtube describing how to joint boards wider than your jointer.  A member here (JGrout) had a document on it too.  I can't find it at the moment though.
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#18
Thanks again for the reply.  Space is limited in my basement, too, and I am intrigued by the jointer/planer idea.  I didn't consider it, quite frankly cause I don't know much about them, and I don't know anyone that has one rather than the two machines.  Love the idea of that size jointing capacity, too.  Any recommendation on brands?  I need to look into that idea, too, before I buy anything.  If not the combo J/P, I think I will bite the bullet and buy both.  If only anyone had inventory.  Thanks again....
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