#12
To you what is the best handle on a saw.

I guess there are a few things to think about

1. Feel
2.  Fit
3. Finish
4. Reliability / Breakage
5. Work ability
6. Type of wood
7. Experience and or how long you have used a saw

Is there more??
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#13
(04-12-2022, 01:00 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: To you what is the best handle on a saw.

I guess there are a few things to think about

1. Feel
2.  Fit
3. Finish
4. Reliability / Breakage
5. Work ability
6. Type of wood
7. Experience and or how long you have used a saw

Is there more??
..................
Yes...Like wine, it has to be one that you like.
Winkgrin
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
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#14
8) Hang angle - does it work with the user's wrist?
9) Handle size - does it fit the user's hand
10) Height of blade - for a backsaw, can it cut as deeply as necessary
11) Plate steel
12) plate steel flat or tapered

(10) is the main reason that I switched from a backsaw to a pullsaw for parting-off on the lathe.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#15
(04-12-2022, 04:00 PM)iclark Wrote: 8) Hang angle - does it work with the user's wrist?
9) Handle size - does it fit the user's hand
10) Height of blade - for a backsaw, can it cut as deeply as necessary
11) Plate steel
12) plate steel flat or tapered

(10) is the main reason that I switched from a backsaw to a pullsaw for parting-off on the lathe.

Hang angle can make all the difference in the quality and speed of a cut.  I remember an exercise Ron Herman did where he took two full size rip saws from different makers.  The hang angle was dramatically different (maybe 20 deg different).  In use, it translated to one being quite a bit more aggressive - which also meant it was faster - and more fatiguing.  Saw selection absolutely had to consider a user's anthropometrics.  An individual's height, arm length, and hand size all factored into how efficiently you could use the saw.

It should be mentioned as well that a handle that's comfortable in your hand won't necessarily make you happy if the tooth geometry isn't right for the way you present the saw to the wood.  If I have to tilt the saw higher because the rake forces me to, I won't be comfortable using the saw.  It's perfectly OK to alter the tooth geometry to help you use the saw comfortably and still get a good cut.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#16
(04-12-2022, 01:00 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: To you what is the best handle on a saw.

I guess there are a few things to think about

1. Feel
2.  Fit
3. Finish
4. Reliability / Breakage
5. Work ability
6. Type of wood
7. Experience and or how long you have used a saw

Is there more??
1. Long, or longer?
2. Light or dark rattan?

-Japanese saw user
Best,
Aram, always learning

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: My woodworking photo site
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#17
On a saw it is mostly about the sharpening and setting. Even a 1000 $ saw with bronce spine,
mother of pearl inlay and polished with some hokus pokus oil is worthless if the theeth are dull.

A 5$ Casio watch can show the time more exactly than some 500$ Rolex.

If you saw a lot (like in day in day out) The handle becomes a bigger factor.
Then it should realy fit your hand.
Any sharp edge can lead to problems,
but so can overpolished surfaces.

The hang of the handle needs to fit with the weight of the spine and the rake of the teeth.
There is not one good hang angel.

Same for the wood: the difference between my heavy and my light wood is about 30%.
That is not unimportant and you have to watch how the saw works.

Cheers
Pedder
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#18
(04-13-2022, 12:47 AM)Pedder Wrote: A 5$ Casio watch can show the time more exactly than some 500$ Rolex.

Cheers
Pedder

Please let me know where you can find a $500 Rolex!  More like anywhere from $6000 to $30,000+, depending on the model and the store.  Most Rolex Authorized Dealers have no inventory for the common man.  They are forced to sell for Rolex's list price.  "Gray Market" dealers and/or surrogates buy the popular models, then turn around and sell them for 2-5X the list price.  A turquoise Rolex Oyster Professional lists for $6K, but Gray Market it's around $30K due to high demand.

Doesn't invalidate your point in any way Pedder!
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#19
(04-13-2022, 12:47 AM)Pedder Wrote: On a saw it is mostly about the sharpening and setting. Even a 1000 $ saw with bronce spine,
mother of pearl inlay and polished with some hokus pokus oil is worthless if the theeth are dull.

A 5$ Casio watch can show the time more exactly than some 500$ Rolex.

If you saw a lot (like in day in day out) The handle becomes a bigger factor.
Then it should realy fit your hand.
Any sharp edge can lead to problems,
but so can overpolished surfaces.

The hang of the handle needs to fit with the weight of the spine and the rake of the teeth.
There is not one good hang angel.

Same for the wood: the difference between my heavy and my light wood is about 30%.
That is not unimportant and you have to watch how the saw works.

Cheers
Pedder
The hang angle is dependent on the depth of cut. You can see that on traditional saws the shallower the saw the higher the angle. A handle that extends down below the tooth line is not quite functional.
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#20
(04-13-2022, 03:28 PM)wmickley Wrote: The hang angle is dependent on the depth of cut. You can see that on traditional saws the shallower the saw the higher the angle. A handle that extends down below the tooth line is not quite functional.

Warren,
   I do agree with some of what you stated. I do try to keep my handles above the tooth line, but it becomes a problem with those xtra large hands. I have also found it is a little easier on the wrist for novice like myself to use a 45* hang dovetails saw if cutting half blind dovetails as well as using a 32* hang when cutting on the moxon vise. The 38* hang seems comfortable to me when cutting at bench height. All and all just a spoiled preference. Once upon a time craftsman had to make due with what they had. Wouldn't you agree? Lastly, Given you prefer to dig out the half blind dovetails with the back of your saw, I would be happy to send you one of my toothed half blind tools to keep, try etc. at no cost to you. I only need to know how thick your dovetail saw plate is and of course your shipping address.
Best wishes,
Ron
BontzSawWorks.net
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#21
See, I just don't care about watches. I realy hadn't any clue how much to pay for a rolex.
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Going off of Pedders post


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