#29
I’m trying to tension a 1” resaw blade on my GO513X. It’s very hard to get the tension over 4 (the manual says to start between 4 and 6. But more importantly, where ever the tension is, it doesn’t stop fluttering.

Is this just a difficulty with such a thick blade? Or is there another issue I should look at?

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#30
(11-05-2022, 04:55 PM)David Stone Wrote: I’m trying to tension a 1” resaw blade on my GO513X.  It’s very hard to get the tension over 4 (the manual says to start between 4 and 6.  But more importantly, where ever the tension is, it doesn’t stop fluttering. 

Is this just a difficulty with such a thick blade? Or is there another issue I should look at?

This is where a tension meter helps a lot.  It will tell you where you are at, and that tells you which way to go, more tension or less.  You can make one for not much money or time.  But before you do that, have you verified that the tension adjustment is free to move when there is no blade installed?  A little grease often helps a lot.  If everything in the tension system looks good and operates smoothly then it's time to make a tension meter and/or call Grizzly.  Worst case, your saw is incapable of tensioning a blade that wide and you'll have to settle for a 3/4" blade.  

John
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#31
David,  I have the same saw, and while it has some great features,  I don't think the tension gauge is one of them.  For me, I went with a 1/2 inch resaw blade, I was concerned that it would not correctly tension a 1 inch blade.  I agree with John that making a tension gauge may make sense, there are lots of plans, I didn't follow this video, but made one using the same principles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iAkRLvLAvI.
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#32
Here's the tension meter I made along with the calculations on how to use it.  You can get similar results using nothing more than a set of Vernier calipers and two little clamps.  

Tension Meter

John
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#33
But, regardless of what the tension actually is, shouldn’t the blade stop fluttering?
What I don’t get about the flutter method, is they say to back off the tension until it starts fluttering.. but my blade is always fluttering.

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#34
(11-07-2022, 07:44 AM)David Stone Wrote: But, regardless of what the tension actually is, shouldn’t the blade stop fluttering?
What I don’t get about the flutter method, is they say to back off the tension until it starts fluttering..  but my blade is always fluttering.

If you can't get much of any tension on it may flutter regardless.  The flutter method is bs.  There are several harmonics on the tension curve.  Get or make a tension meter and use it to determine what the actual tension is on any particular blade vs. what the onboard indicator shows.  

John
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#35
Which blade? Some blades were adapted to woodworking use but designed for metal cutting such as the lennox (which requires bonkers levels of tension at least according to Lennox) and then there are others like the Laguna resaw master which tension with considerably less psi.

Full disclosure, I own and have used both a fair bit, preference is the Laguna, though the Lennos when setup perfectly can leave an edge that only requires a bit of sanding. Tension is no issue for me though - MM16 saw - tension gauge still sucks on the saw though, lol.
Every day find time to appreciate life. It is far too short and 'things' happen. RIP Willem
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#36
(11-07-2022, 09:09 AM)MichaelS Wrote: Which blade?  Some blades were adapted to woodworking use but designed for metal cutting such as the lennox (which requires bonkers levels of tension at least according to Lennox) and then there are others like the Laguna resaw master which tension with considerably less psi.

Full disclosure, I own and have used both a fair bit, preference is the Laguna, though the Lennos when setup perfectly can leave an edge that only requires a bit of sanding.  Tension is no issue for me though - MM16 saw - tension gauge still sucks on the saw though, lol.

If by "bonkers levels of tension" you mean 25 ksi or so, yeah, that's in the range Lennox recommends for its blades, because that's where bandsaw blades give optimum performance, a combination of efficient cutting and long life.  It doesn't mean you can't get acceptable performance at lower tension, but the blade won't cut as efficiently or last as long.  The Timberwolf marketing gimmick of great performance at low tension is just that, a gimmick.  There is nothing magic about the steel in their blades being able to cut more efficiently at low tension.  

FWIW, Lennox makes plenty of blades specifically for woodworking.  The Laguna Resaw King comes in a thinner gage band than the Lennox carbide tooth blades, so it can be more easily tensioned.  However, it still runs best in the range of 25 ksi.  

John
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#37
I dont disagree with anything you said. I thought the 0513 was a different model bs though and may struggle to get to 25-30k psi. As the trimaster was designed for metal it has its own history and performance requirements - not just psi. I agree with the advice to buy or make a tension meter though. These carbide blades arent cheap and getting the most out of them requires accurate setup.

Michael
Every day find time to appreciate life. It is far too short and 'things' happen. RIP Willem
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#38
(11-08-2022, 07:52 AM)MichaelS Wrote: I dont disagree with anything you said. I thought the 0513 was a different model bs though and may struggle to get to 25-30k psi. As the trimaster was designed for metal it has its own history and performance requirements - not just psi. I agree with the advice to buy or make a tension meter though. These carbide blades arent cheap and getting the most out of them requires accurate setup.

Michael

I just looked at the G0513.  Sure seems like it ought to be able to tension a 1" blade.  The steel spine Grizzly saws are pretty robust.  I have no trouble putting 25 ksi on a 1" blade on my G0636X.  I overdid it once and had 42 ksi on that blade, which proved it can put 25 ksi on the 1-3/8" max width blade Grizzly says it can use.  The fact that the OP is struggling reinforces the need to measure the tension to know where he's at.  

I've never understood why people use the Trimaster for cutting wood.  You are right that it was developed for cutting metal.  The Woodmaster CT is much cheaper and cuts beautifully in wood, probably because it was designed for that task.  Cuts great, costs less, what's not to like?  And because it has fewer teeth it's possible to resharpen it yourself.  Another win.  

Set up is definitely important to getting good performance and life out of a blade.  But here's an interesting factoid.  Higher tension covers a lot of sins.  A blade running at 25 ksi will cut straight, longer, than that same blade running at 15 ksi, just to pick a number.  Guides become almost irrelevant, too, at high tension.  Everything just gets easier when the blade has enough tension to do what it inherently wants to do.  

John
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Trouble Tensioning BS Blade


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