#8
I'm making an interior barn door with a poplar frame and one large glass lite. The glass will sit in rabbets. How much extra space do I need in the rabbets to account for wood expansion/contraction so the glass isn't stressed?
Reply

#9
I have made several interior doors with leaded glass windows in them. I leave 1/8" clearance for movement. No problems with seasonal changes. I have noticed 1 door slightly sticks in the jamb in the summer months.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
22 year cancer survivor
Reply

#10
I concur, make the glass 1/8" smaller than the cutout.  And if these are passage doors, you have to use tempered or laminated glass.  

John
Reply
#11
Seasonal movement is due to changes in temp and humidity. Since these doors will be in a climate controlled environment and because the frames will be relatively narrow, this will be of minimal concern. 1/8" is probably good. One point not mentioned however, is the weight of the glass. It is possible for this weight to flex a light frame. So, if your frame will be thin you may need to set your glass in silicone or something similar in order for the whole door to stay ridgid and resist sagging.
Reply

#12
(11-23-2022, 05:05 PM)Willyou Wrote: Seasonal movement is due to changes in temp and humidity. Since these doors will be in a climate controlled environment and because the frames will be relatively narrow, this will be of minimal concern. 1/8" is probably good. One point not mentioned however, is the weight of the glass. It is possible for this weight to flex a light frame. So, if your frame will be thin you may need to set your glass in silicone or something similar in order for the whole door to stay ridgid and resist sagging.

It is good practice in most parts of the country to allow for what can happen during extended power outages. Our region has experienced winter power outages of up to 2 weeks due to ice storms. Power outages due to hurricanes can often be 7-10 days long. If you are in areas prone to flooding, power loss coupled with high humidity seems to be a recurring event.

Calking the glass into the opening with silicone or any other calk essentially removes any expansion/contraction allowance. A better approach would be to make sure that the barn door hangers attach to the front AND the back of the door with the rollers centered over the door. Then, position the glass so that it is centered fore-and-aft in the door, too.

To avoid having the glass rattle, those small rubber beads for panel slots can be useful. You may need to increase the clearance around the glass to use them, though.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
Reply

#13
(4 hours ago)iclark Wrote: It is good practice in most parts of the country to allow for what can happen during extended power outages. Our region has experienced winter power outages of up to 2 weeks due to ice storms. Power outages due to hurricanes can often be 7-10 days long. If you are in areas prone to flooding, power loss coupled with high humidity seems to be a recurring event.

Calking the glass into the opening with silicone or any other calk essentially removes any expansion/contraction allowance. A better approach would be to make sure that the barn door hangers attach to the front AND the back of the door with the rollers centered over the door. Then, position the glass so that it is centered fore-and-aft in the door, too.

To avoid having the glass rattle, those small rubber beads for panel slots can be useful. You may need to increase the clearance around the glass to use them, though.

You are correct. I should have said "as long as they are in climate controlled environment".  It is good practice to allow for seasonal movement anyway for the possible event that climate control becomes unavailable.
Also, I forgot we were dealing with a barn door rather than a hinged one. I once had a problem with a hinged china cabinet door sagging due to the weight of the glass.
However, I still think that in most glass doors of that type, if frame and muttins are thin enough seasonal movement will not be a serious concern.
Reply
glass door


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.