More about planing end grain
#21
  Re: RE: More about planing end grain by Derek Cohen ([quote] [color=#000...)
(10-27-2020, 11:32 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: I don't. Why would one? Dovetailing end grain is one thing. That is mechanical. Why would you want to rebate end grain? It would end up a weak joint.
Regards from Perth
Derek

Double-lap dovetails which leave only one thin line of end-grain showing rather than the joint itself -- seen on period furniture when joinery was not considered decorative nor dovetails a particular accomplishment, and the joint too long for full, secret mitered dovetails to be practical.  The top to side joint on slant-front desks comes immediately to mind.  Also used when the piece was to be veneered, as it's possible to deal with the thin line of end grain relatively successfully, but veneering over pins and tails would surely telegraph through -- this from a period when veneer was first able to be sawn thinly enough that telegraphing was an issue.

You'd also rebate, and thus usually plane, the end grain on a drawer side when accommodating cockbeading.
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#22
  Re: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese (Tom posted about pla...)
All this is really stealing Ron's thread. My apology Ron. I am happy to remove.


I still cannot recall any use for a rebate planed in end grain without it being part of a mechanical joint.

My most recent example of this was lipped half-blind dovetail drawers ...

[Image: Drawer5a.jpg]

[Image: 3a.jpg]

[Image: 4a.jpg]

[Image: 18a.jpg]

[Image: EntryHallTableForANiece12_html_1433a67d.jpg]

Website:  http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/E...awers.html

Here's a video of the dovetailing ... ignore my spluttering at the start
Smile  ...



Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at www.inthewoodshop.com
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#23
  Re: RE: More about planing end grain by Derek Cohen (All this is really s...)
(10-28-2020, 12:43 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: All this is really stealing Ron's thread. My apology Ron. I am happy to remove.


I still cannot recall any use for a rebate planed in end grain without it being part of a mechanical joint.

Not a bother Derek. This forum is to be for discussion.

Ron
"which plane should I use for this task?......the sharp one"

http://www.breseplane.blogspot.com/
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#24
  Re: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese (Tom posted about pla...)
Great video Ron. Not sure how this morphed into dovetails. Right at the 3.04 mark was a very important part on reducing tear, speltching or what ever it is called.

Even with very sharp blades, some woods will still have a rough feeling end grain.

I recently finished a federal style card table out of cherry. No secondary wood. All cherry since I had a bunch to use up. 

The knuckle joints required end grain planing to shape. A trick is to clamp a piece of scrap wood as can be seen here to prevent tear out. Take it step by step. That little blob is a chunk of paraffin wax that I use.  

   

   

I am currently working on a walnut table using some gnarly walnut with a little live edge.

   

Even with the crazy grain, I was able to flatten and smooth the top. The next trick will be the ends. Not sure if they will get a bevel on the top edge ot bottom. Most likly the bottom.
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#25
  Re: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese (Tom posted about pla...)
Quote:Not sure how this morphed into dovetails.

Right. Let's go back to planing end grain. Here are two planes and reasons using them on through dovetailed and mitred Hard Maple ...

Firstly, Veritas LA Jack with 25 degree bevel for roughing out. Plane from both ends and meet in the middle ..

[Image: HarlequinRoundingTheDovetails_html_m7a681c71.jpg]

[Image: HarlequinRoundingTheDovetails_html_7c6f2b26.jpg]

... and then a small block plane - LN #60 1/2 - for smoothing down ...

[Image: HarlequinRoundingTheDovetails_html_mde64b34.jpg]

Finish with sandpaper ..

[Image: HarlequinRoundingTheDovetails_html_29b981f1.jpg]

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at www.inthewoodshop.com
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#26
  Re: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese (Tom posted about pla...)
(10-26-2020, 02:39 PM)Ron Brese Wrote: Tom posted about planing end grain. There are several schools of thought but I thought I'd post a link to a video that shows end grain can be handled with many planes. At about the 2:30 mark I plane end grain with a 55 degree pitched small smoother.  So there ya go.

Ron

https://youtu.be/cODEfZ9Xu6Q

All these examples go to show that planes are extremely versatile tools and can be used in a myriad of ways. As long as they are in good fettle. Which is why when ask what plane to use on a given task my answer is always "the sharp one!".

Ron
"which plane should I use for this task?......the sharp one"

http://www.breseplane.blogspot.com/
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#27
  Re: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese (Tom posted about pla...)
yep...pick one..
Winkgrin
   

Something in a Size 3?  Or, would you prefer something a bit larger...?
   
say, in a size 4, maybe?
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#28
  Re: RE: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese ([quote='Ron Brese' p...)
(10-30-2020, 07:49 AM)Ron Brese Wrote: All these examples go to show that planes are extremely versatile tools and can be used in a myriad of ways. As long as they are in good fettle. Which is why when ask what plane to use on a given task my answer is always "the sharp one!".

Ron

Are we to suppose that you cannot tell the difference between planing end grain with a 45 degree plane and a 55 degree plane?
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#29
  Re: RE: More about planing end grain by wmickley ([quote='Ron Brese' p...)
(11-01-2020, 07:51 AM)wmickley Wrote: Are we to suppose that you cannot tell the difference between planing end grain with a 45 degree plane and a 55 degree plane?

Didn't say that Warren, just that there is more than one way to do this and if it's the difference between getting your task completed and stopping to fettle another plane then you have that option.

Ron
"which plane should I use for this task?......the sharp one"

http://www.breseplane.blogspot.com/
Reply
#30
  Re: More about planing end grain by Ron Brese (Tom posted about pla...)
Your penance is ten Hail Moxons and an act of charity (send me a plane). Ego te absolvo. Go in peace to love and serve the Lord.
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