Now that's a kickback!
#91
  Re: Now that's a kickback! by Humanbackhoe (While working on a p...)
I am certainly glad you were not hurt in the blink of the eye that this kickback took.
I taught cabinet making for 35 years on the high school level using 3 unisaws at same time that tilted right and from my limited perspective here there are a few problems with how the original cut was being made.
You need to decrease your exposure to harms way by having the blade 1/8" to no higher than 1/4" above your work.
You cannot rely on your hold downs to keep the work where it belongs during the entire cutting process.
You need 2 push sticks on the stock at ALL times when ripping with one securely providing down pressure to the right of the blade area the other push stick is used to push the stock down and forward and towards the right or fence at the rear of the stock and as far away from the fence without interfering with the blade as possible while ripping.
Lastly and just as important is to push the stock well past the blade before you relax and stop pushing with the rear stick as the front stick continues to hold the stock down between the blade and the fence.
Also try your best to stand as far to the left of the fence and blade as possible to allow for human error in using your sticks to control your stock. This will in most cases allow the kicked back stock to pass harmlessly to the space you left open to your right side.
I always demonstrated the cause of most kick backs, by pinching the blade from the opposite or left outside, while demonstrating how to use the table saws. The students loved to watch and see how the kickback occurred as well as with what ferosity and distance they would travel. During one demonstration of how kick back occurred a piece of 1" x 1" oak punched a hole in a concrete block wall a good 20 feet from the saw.
Remember when ripping always have the part you want between the blade and the rip fence; try at all costs to avoid any pressure on the left or outside of the saw blade as this is what causes most kick backs other than the stock lifting above the blade as in this case. A further note in 35years I never had a student hurt on the table saws or any other machine they operated in the shop and we made loads of furniture every year from mostly solid stock and furniture grade plywood.
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#92
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by trophy (I am certainly glad ...)
First of all I commend you for being able to keep teenagers safe while using power tools. Just keeping them focused during a safety lesson is a monumental accomplishment. I was taught never to reach across the blade and to stand to the right as the rip neared completion. Obviously with your safe record, your way is not wrong. BTW some guards were unavailable when I started High school. They were all there before I graduated in '77.

I've been following this thread for a while because the kickback curf is similar to the one that bit all five digits on my left hand. One of the three things I noticed right away was picked up by Rick Christopherson. The board was bevel cut the entire length. The second was that the kickback started only a few inches away from clearing the back of the blade. The third was that there was no outfeed table to support the board which would have been mostly hanging off the saw. I don't want to get into the guard vs. no guard discussion (There's another thread for that.) but I don't see how anyone can be in complete control of a board that has only a few inches still resting on the far side of a table. My combined extension/outfeed table allows me to make a cut anywhere on a 4' x 8' sheet and it will stay on the table after the cut. I feel without an outfeed table you're asking for a kickback on a bevel cut reguardless of which side the fence is on.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#93
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by trophy (I am certainly glad ...)
trophy said:


You need to decrease your exposure to harms way by having the blade 1/8" to no higher than 1/4" above your work.




I believe that you know that, as for the blade height above the workpiece, there are 2 schools...

It looks to me that by saying to set the blade 1/8~1/4" above the work, you are referring to a "No blade guard installed" condition and in this case you are correct but also wrong because...the blade guard should be installed (at least when you are teaching the kids)

Personally, I don't agree with you (and I think that also Rick will not http://www.waterfront-woods.com/Articles...blesaw.htm and Ian Kirby)

I just want to note that even if you set the blade to 1/4" above the work and lets say, cutting a 2" thick wood, you still have 2¼" of exposed blade before and after the cut....too much of "naked blade" for me...

What I'm getting from "High blade" ?
Faster feeding rate (easier on the motor, cooler moter - cooler blade), no burn marks and even a glue line (the Makita blade on the pics is of 100T)

On the pics, you can see how high I'm setting the blade (max height)




















Just to make it clear, I use High blade only while cutting Solid Wood....with all the other man-made sheets, I use Low blade to reduce the chipping on the lower side...

Regards
niki
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#94
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by WYWoodworker (Glad it was the wind...)
WyWoodworker......The Grip-Tite flew about 12 feet to the window and I found glass about 30 feet into the yard.

The sig line was an offshoot (heh) of that kickback.

Andrew
"That's like getting a running start and diving headfirst into the vortex."

                                 Steve Freidman 4/21/2013
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#95
  Re: Now that's a kickback! by Humanbackhoe (While working on a p...)
Well, I hope we all learned a lesson here... table saws are dangerous and we need to find something safer to cut our wood with!!!



Try a handsaw next time!!



I am glad you posted this, as it makes everyone think about safety! This forum has made me think about safety more often and that is a good thing.

The trapped cut was not a problem, until the board raised up off the saw table top and engaged the blade in a bad way. I have cut like this many times and never had a kickback. When I bought a cabinet table saw, I got a left tilt version to avoid this situation.

Glad you were unharmed!!!!




Al
I turn, therefore I am!
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#96
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by Humanbackhoe (Yeah, I think that's...)
Humanbackhoe said:


Yeah, I think that's what happened. Usually that isn't a problem, but, it looks like I'll be using the fence on the left side of the blade for those bevel cuts.




BINGO, we have a winner. Hopefully we all learn from our mistakes, good thing you didn`t have to suffer an injury to learn.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#97
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by woodhead (Well, I hope we all ...)
[blockquote]woodhead said:


Well, I hope we all learned a lesson here... table saws are dangerous and we need to find something safer to cut our wood with!!!



Try a handsaw next time!!



____________________________________________


Well, perhaps you're right. I had a terrible case of handsaw kickback the other day. My wife had sent me out into the garage to get to work on the honey-do list. I had picked up a handsaw and a board, and then it happened. My wife came out thirty minutes later to find me sitting on a stool, a beer in one hand and the newspaper in the other, all kicked back.
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#98
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by mlincoln ([blockquote]woodhead...)
LOL.

Just in to say THANK YOU to all who spent the time discussing experience in this thread. I'd much rather read and learn from others experience - haven't had a kick back myself yet, but did have a board float up on me and felt like it was getting out of control once. Scary.

I do tend to stand right behind the blade when I push material through.
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#99
  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by pap (LOL.[br][br]Just in ...)
pap....there is some well written info and suggestions on Rick Christopherson's web site. Definitely worth checking out.

http://www.waterfront-woods.com

Andrew
"That's like getting a running start and diving headfirst into the vortex."

                                 Steve Freidman 4/21/2013
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  Re: Re: Now that's a kickback! by mlincoln ([blockquote]woodhead...)
mlincoln said:

Well, perhaps you're right. I had a terrible case of handsaw kickback the other day. My wife had sent me out into the garage to get to work on the honey-do list. I had picked up a handsaw and a board, and then it happened. My wife came out thirty minutes later to find me sitting on a stool, a beer in one hand and the newspaper in the other, all kicked back.







It wouldn't be the first time I was the last one know!
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