Restoring an Old Drill Press
#41
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - QUILL AND SPINDLE by AgGEM (Skisso,[br]Is the Ja...)
Thanks all.

Hank, I remember that discussion about Jeff's service and may contact him for some info. May or may not decide to send this off for bearings... these are in quite good condition, and the way the whole thing is designed tends to be protective of the open sides. I've also rebuilt a few 6A chucks over time, so hope/expect to be able to get this one back into good working condition... perhaps with the help of some parts from old ones that are stashed in a drawer.

AgGEM said:

Is the Jacobs taper machined into the quill or is it removable? If removable, is it a Morse up yonder?



Ag, the jacobs 33 taper is machined into the spindle, which is just one long piece of bar stock with splines on one end and the taper on the other. I can't tell/don't recall how that lower bearing retainer/threaded nut collar attaches to the spindle, but I believe it may be pinned through the little spanner nut holes. I have never removed that piece on any of these before, tho, so am not sure. But the spindle itself does have the machined taper. No morse to be found anywhere.
Bill
Know, think, choose, do -- Ender's Shadow
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#42
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - QUILL AND SPINDLE by skizzo (Thanks all. [br] [...)
Great thread Skizzo. Thanks for taking the extra time to photograph and post about the restoration.
Cannon
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#43
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - QUILL AND SPINDLE by skizzo (Thanks all. [br] [...)
Thank you, Skiz....
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#44
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - QUILL AND SPINDLE by skizzo (Thanks all. [br] [...)
I didn't get much done tonight, but what did get done was sweet. First, I dropped off the table at my friend David's place, fellow woodnetter and owwm'er dtsails, who is going to run it in his electrolysis tank for a day or so. Pics of the spooge tank and process to come later after I get it back. Thanks, David.

Then I spent just a little time on the motor, focusing on getting the motor pulley off. Again, this is one of the big unknowns for the project, given the condition of the pulley, and in many ways is one the last of the major possible catastrophic failure points. It's not as problematic as the earlier ones, though, because step pulleys can sometimes be found for round shafts... as opposed to the unobtainium splined pulley on the spindle.

In any event, this is the starting point. I have been soaking the pulley bore and motor shaft with WD40 from the end and through the set screw hole for three days now, before even starting to work on it. But I have no idea if it's done much good, because it just sits on top and doesn't run down around the edge at all. I'm not too optimistic, and am really going to be cautious.







Time to get out the mega-cheapo $30 Harbor Freight Gear Puller... which is one of the most useful tools in my whole place. I have already bent one of the rods in the past, and know that I'll break it some day, but it has provided great service regardless.




I've used this enough times to know it's not going to fit as intended, so I just do the best I can by mounting it on the second smallest sheave. If I take it all the way to the smallest, the outside bars won't fit around the largest sheave. But putting it here means the tie bolts that hold the two sides together are too short.




No surprise, because I've been down that road before. That's why there's a BFC-clamp hanging right over there behind one of the tool cabinets. Working with all three hands, sometimes four, I finally get the C-clamp in place to hold the two sections together, and clamp them tight.




So far so good, nothing too bad so far. Now, tho, we have to see what gives first... the pulley on the shaft (desired outcome), the puller contraption on the pulley (will need to try again), or the pulley sheave breaking (screwed). Slowly, slowly, slowly tighten the puller drive shaft. Creak, groan... stop and check... turn... squeak... aha, movement! Another turn, yep, definitely moving the pulley up the shaft.




Everything in the contraption seems to be holding in place and the pulley is moving as desired. Crank it on off.




Almost there, almost there... chunk, stuck, huh? Oh, the drive shaft reached the end of its travel. Over to the parts bin and grab a steel pin to finish it off. I have pins made out of 3/8", 1/2", and 5/8" bar stock to fit different size motor shafts (each 1/8" undersized for the respective bore). Insert the pin in the pulley bore and finish driving out the pulley.




Done. Say many hallelujahs, set it there, and go have a cold one. That was great.




I'm off tomorrow and will have most of the day for shop time. First thing to do is open up the motor to get the replacement bearings ordered, then the rest of the day can be spent stripping and prepping for paint. Moving right along.

Total shop time tonight, half an hour, plus a nice visit with a friend, his lovely wife, and their son... a very nice evening.
Bill
Know, think, choose, do -- Ender's Shadow
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#45
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - MOTOR PULLEY by skizzo (I didn't get much do...)
Taking what Bill posted to the next level, there is a specific puller just for pulleys. It looks a lot like a bearing splitter, but its designed to fit into the grooves of a pulley. In this photo the pulley puller is in the top left hand corner (image stolen from owwm):




I used one to pull the step pulley off another motor and although the 2 jaw puller was stretched pretty wide, it turned out to be a rather simple pull:




It is a handy thing to have and I wasn't aware they existed. I understand they may not be a smart purchase for everyone though.
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#46
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - MOTOR PULLEY by skizzo (I didn't get much do...)
skizzo said:


Time to get out the mega-cheapo $30 Harbor Freight Gear Puller... which is one of the most useful tools in my whole place. I have already bent one of the rods in the past, and know that I'll break it some day, but it has provided great service regardless.







Bill, nice documentary on the DP restoration.

Funny thing about those Harbor Freight gear pullers - I have a set also, as well as an Owatonna Tool Company bearing splitter. The OTC one suffered a bent connecting bolt when doing a fairly easy pull. The Harbor Freight set has worked flawlessy for some very hard pulls. The entire HF set cost less than the single OTC bearing splitter.

Just an FYI

Greg
The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
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#47
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - MOTOR PULLEY by gregr ([blockquote]skizzo s...)
gregr said:

The Harbor Freight set has worked flawlessy for some very hard pulls.



Yep. And the fact that it's cheap lets you try some things with it you might not do otherwise. What I especially like is that tapered inner flange. One time, I filed the edge down to a pretty thin and sharp edge in order to get it back behind something that had almost no gap at all. Put the two halves in place, then used clamps on the two places where the bolts go to clamp it down and draw it together. It wedged its way in enough to get a bite that allowed a small pull, then tightened them down some more and kept working it until they fit all the way in. It's a nice little rig.

Nice pulley puller, Johnny. If you ever come across another one cheap, snag it and let me know. That would be really useful.
Bill
Know, think, choose, do -- Ender's Shadow
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#48
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - MOTOR PULLEY by skizzo ([blockquote]gregr sa...)
The blind hole puller is awesome too. Especially if you end up with a bearing in one of your end bells when you get into the motor.
Looking forward to that. I want to compare the WT to a Kingston Conley I was working on recently.
Buck

Business Meetings - None of us is as dumb as all of us.
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#49
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - MOTOR PULLEY by Buckaroo (The blind hole pulle...)
Buckaroo said:

The blind hole puller is awesome too. Especially if you end up with a bearing in one of your end bells when you get into the motor.



Huh? Got leads or links on that for more info? I remember reading about them before and that's just about where I'm at right now, except I'm stumped one step earlier. I can't get the rotor shaft out of the bearing on the enclosed end... or, alternatively, the bearing out of the well. I'm just sitting down to put up some photos and start another thread on motors, using this one as a starting point. Ordering bearings doesn't look like it's going to happen today since I can't get one of the end bells off to get to the second one.
Bill
Know, think, choose, do -- Ender's Shadow
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#50
  Re: Re: Restoring an Old Drill Press - MOTOR PULLEY by skizzo ([blockquote]Buckaroo...)
My new best friend.




Blind hole bearing puller
Not carried at all stores. I was lucky.

Mine were stuck as well and I had aluminum end bells. I got a block of wood and put it up against the bell and tapped around it with a hammer (lightly of course) I thought the bearings would come out on the shaft but they didn't; both sides stayed in the bells. That's when the puller came in handy.










Hope yours looks better inside than this one did

Buck

Business Meetings - None of us is as dumb as all of us.
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