Frog Angles...
#21
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (Corneel, great video...)
Good luck

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#22
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (Corneel, great video...)
titanxt said:


Corneel, great video! I love to see videos and pictures of fellow Woodnet members in their shops. I will sharpen up my blades again and set that chipbreaker as close as I possibly can and give that a try thins morning.

Thank you all!

Andy




It will take both - chipbreaker set very close AND very sharp blade. If either isn't right, you'll still get tearout. Frankly, you don't need a tight mouth if the first two criteria are met. And don't try to hog out thick shavings. Keep them wispy thin.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#23
  Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (I have been planning...)
Freshly sharpened blades, slight skew at times, very light shavings, and a card scraper saved the day... I will post some pictures on my "Hand Tool Cabinet Building and Planning" thread.

Thank you all!

Andy
I am quickly realizing that I have NO natural talent... But I am trying to fake it.

http://www.creeativewoodworking.net
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#24
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (Freshly sharpened bl...)
titanxt said:


Freshly sharpened blades,...




Andy, What is your sharpening routine? What is your final honing grit?
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#25
  Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (I have been planning...)
"The ruler trick" that Charlesworth uses will get you a raised cutting angle quick and easy. The Veritas MKII has a really nice back bevel feature as well.

The ruler trick is also handy for getting into fresh iron on a pitted iron back without all the painstaking flattening to otherwise remove it.


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#26
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by Kansas City Fireslayer ("The ruler trick" th...)
Kansas City Fireslayer said:


"The ruler trick" that Charlesworth uses will get you a raised cutting angle quick and easy. The Veritas MKII has a really nice back bevel feature as well.

The ruler trick is also handy for getting into fresh iron on a pitted iron back without all the painstaking flattening to otherwise remove it.




At best, the ruler trick might add 2 degrees to the effective cutting angle. For really gnarly woods, if you're going to attack it with cutting angle, I think you need a 55-62 degree cutting angle. That would be a pretty severe back bevel, requiring a pretty thick ruler.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#27
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by AHill ([blockquote]Kansas C...)
Currently, I am using a Worksharp 3000 and going up to 1500-grit. I finish by running the blade over a piece of MDF with the .5 micron green crayon from LV. If done correctly, I get hair-popping results.

Andy
I am quickly realizing that I have NO natural talent... But I am trying to fake it.

http://www.creeativewoodworking.net
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#28
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (Currently, I am usin...)
Quote:

If done correctly, I get hair-popping results.




It's easy to pick out a woodworker when you shake his hand and notice a hair-less swath on his forearm.

~Dan.
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#29
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by titanxt (Currently, I am usin...)
titanxt said:


Currently, I am using a Worksharp 3000 and going up to 1500-grit. I finish by running the blade over a piece of MDF with the .5 micron green crayon from LV. If done correctly, I get hair-popping results.

Andy




Assuming you're taking the wire burr off the backside of the blade, that's adequately sharp. The only other thing I would suggest is taking your chipbreaker and seeing if the angle where it mates with the blade is less than 30 deg. You want it to be pretty steep - like 50 deg. You really want that chipbreaker to turn the shaving almost to the point where it's being directed to the front of the plane.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#30
  Re: Re: Frog Angles... by AHill ([blockquote]titanxt ...)
I should have said that I am using Hock blades and chip breakers.

Andy
I am quickly realizing that I have NO natural talent... But I am trying to fake it.

http://www.creeativewoodworking.net
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