Saw Till Questions
#11
  Re: (...)
I'm finally ready to build a simple saw till, but have a question about spacing between the saws.

First, how much space between saw handles? Looking at the various pictures it seems that 1/2" or so is around the norm.

Assuming 1/2" is about right, how do you get the saws out? With only 1/2" (or less) between the handles, it seems that ever time I grab a saw, I'm going to knock two more out of the till. Is the answer that you grab the saw by the plate?

Last question has to do with the bar the the handles rest on. Is there any benefit to putting shallow rounded indents into the bar to help keep the handles in place. Or is that just a waste?

Thanks in advance

Steve
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#12
  Re: Saw Till Questions by Steve Friedman (I'm finally ready to...)
Steve,
When I built my "minimalist saw till" I made the slots on 1 3/8" centers. That allows enough room for you to get your fingers in and grab the saw handle but still allows for maximum storage capability.







I also used a plain wooden dowel for the handle rest. So far this has worked out great for me.
See ya around,
Dominic
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Don't you love it when you ask someone what time it is and to prove how smart they are, they tell you how to build a watch?
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#13
  Re: Re: Saw Till Questions by Blacky's Boy (Steve,[br]When I bui...)
Thanks Dominic. I tried to figure out the spacing based on your drawing before posting. I was only off by 1/8".

Mine will definitely not have doors. In fact, I plan to have the sides follow the profile of the saws so that I can still see the stuff that will be stored to the side of the till. Just want the sides deep enough to keep the handles from getting banged around and keep other things from getting sliced on the saw teeth. Not just fingers, but I have already cut an air compressor hose on a hanging saw. Not my fault. It's Marv's fault for making the saws so sharp!

Steve
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#14
  Re: Re: Saw Till Questions by Steve Friedman (Thanks Dominic. I t...)
Steve Friedman said:

Thanks Dominic. I tried to figure out the spacing based on your drawing before posting. I was only off by 1/8".




Hey, you could always stop by and see the original.....


Steve Friedman said:

Mine will definitely not have doors. In fact, I plan to have the sides follow the profile of the saws so that I can still see the stuff that will be stored to the side of the till. Just want the sides deep enough to keep the handles from getting banged around and keep other things from getting sliced on the saw teeth.




As my Dad would always say, "That's why they make Chocolate AND Vanilla"

I'm actually REALLY glad I put the doors on. With my recent family room project I was using my tablesaw a lot. Everything not in a cabinet had a fine layer of dust on it. Even with the air filter and DC going.
See ya around,
Dominic
------------------------------
Don't you love it when you ask someone what time it is and to prove how smart they are, they tell you how to build a watch?
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#15
  Re: Re: Saw Till Questions by Steve Friedman (Thanks Dominic. I t...)
Hey Steve...

Don't be dropping your favorite saws on the floor. A till is a great idea. I would put detents in whatever the handles rest on. The detents will ensure that the handles are always the same distance apart. Set a number of saws up side by side and use your fingers to determine how much space feels right for you. I know, based on what you told me, you'll be acquiring more saws in the future. With that in mind, make your till with the future in mind.

I know it's a weird idea, because no one else has done it, as far as I know, but if space is a factor, you could built your till so you have one saw with the toe pointing up and the one next to it pointing down and remove a saw by grasping the blade. I didn't say that it's a good idea, just weird.



I think LV sells a device that you can hang something thin like a saw blade in it. Maybe someone here is familiar with it.

I had thoughts of making a hanging device that has a roller in it that will move up when a saw blade is slipped upward into it, then when the saw slides down a little, the roller rolls down and presses the blade against a gripping surface and prevents the saw from sliding farther down. To remove the saw, just move it upward and slide it out. This isn't an original idea. There are ways to allow something to slide in one direction but not the other direction. I know this isn't helping you determine the space between your saws in your till, but just thought I'd bloviate a bit.



Sorry about those saws being too sharp.

Catchalater,
Marv


I did then what I knew how to do. Now that I know better, I do better.”
― Maya Angelou

I'm working toward my PHD.  (Projects Half Done)
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#16
  Re: Saw Till Questions by Steve Friedman (I'm finally ready to...)
Steve Friedman said:


Last question has to do with the bar the the handles rest on. Is there any benefit to putting shallow rounded indents into the bar to help keep the handles in place. Or is that just a waste?
Steve




My current saw till (ugh) does not have detents on the bar; my next till (in progress) will. It should make it easier to quickly get the saws back in place.

Perhaps this weekend I'll drag out the Dremel and add detents to the existing till just to be sure it is a good idea.
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#17
  Re: Re: Saw Till Questions by MarvW (Hey Steve...[br][br]...)
MarvW said:

Don't be dropping your favorite saws on the floor.



Thanks for the advice. Just trying to keep you in business.

MarvW said:

I had thoughts of making a hanging device that has a roller in it that will move up when a saw blade is slipped upward into it, then when the saw slides down a little, the roller rolls down and presses the blade against a gripping surface and prevents the saw from sliding farther down. To remove the saw, just move it upward and slide it out. This isn't an original idea. There are ways to allow something to slide in one direction but not the other direction.



I forgot about the saw till with the little rubber balls.




Lee Valley had these, but I think saw plates are too thin.




I'm inclined to keep this simple. I have them hanging on hooks, so for now, I'm just trying to store them so saw don't bang into each other. Reminds me of the barn scene in Twister.

Steve
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#18
  Re: Re: Saw Till Questions by Chuck Nickerson ([blockquote]Steve Fr...)
Chuck Nickerson said:


Perhaps this weekend I'll drag out the Dremel and add detents to the existing till just to be sure it is a good idea.



Chuck, that's perfect. I'll hold off until you test it.



Steve
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#19
  Re: Saw Till Questions by Steve Friedman (I'm finally ready to...)
Really glad you asked the question

I have no answers but I do a have a thought. You might want to consider doors because then you have the option of using the space at the saw tips. The triangular space between the saw handles and tips usually goes to waste. Put a little box in that space and you can store quite a lot of smaller items. Maybe stuff like saw files and ....

I have no shortage of demand for places to put things.

Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#20
  Re: Re: Saw Till Questions by Blacky's Boy ([blockquote]Steve Fr...)
Blacky's Boy said:


Hey, you could always stop by and see the original.....



Thanks for the offer. Can I just borrow yours for a while?

No tablesaw here, but plenty of dust nonetheless. I agree about doors being great, especially for rust. Problem is space and light. Part of my wood storage is in a corner to the right of where this till is going. If the till is too deep, I won't be able to see or reach anything in that corner. I'll just try to be good about keeping the saws coated with rust preventative.

This wall of my garage has exposed studs, so I'm even toying with the idea of recessing the kerf board (that's what I'm calling the top board that has the saw kerfs in it) into the stud cavity so that the handles can get closer to the wall.

Steve
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