Trestle Table....With A Twist
#11
  Re: (...)
No, you silly people, it's not warped like most of my projects (or my thought process). The lines are straight.....uh, well, mostly. It's different - by about two thirds or so. I built it pint-sized for my growing brood of grandchildren. It's based on an article in Popular Woodworking by Chris Schwarz.

By the way, my apologies for being AWOL for a bit; I haven't posted or even read the forum for a while. It's been nice to take this little break, build something, and share it here.

Life has been happening. Three grandchildren in three months makes life interesting, to say the least (plus a 2+ year old). All healthy, although one little (and I mean little) bugger was in baby intensive care for a bit.

The eldest is just over two, and is getting really active. One of his favorite activities is banging all his toys on our coffee table. Sooooo, it was time to make one for the kiddos, that would double as a kid's table at Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, birthdays, etc. And since it's made from Douglas Fir construction lumber, they can bang to their heart's content. Isn't it great when you can get your wood fix and make the family happy?



As mentioned, I started with construction lumber that has been drying in my garage for 7 or 8 months. Which in our climate means it's as dry as a popcorn fart. Definitely ready.





Mostly 2x10s with a pith, so I went about carving them up to eliminate the pith and as many knots as I could. The result was mostly kinda quarter sawn, with all but the smallest knots gone. Nice and easy to work.

Since time has been at a premium, I did use some power tools for the milling. But also a bunch of hand tools, so it belongs on this forum. I tried to use my power jointer to save some time, but I made an awful mess of that. How can I start with a perfectly good rectangle and end up with a rhombohedron?????

The results were ghastly, but really easy to fix with a good ol' trusty Stanley #6. The power jointer has been put away, and I'm tempted to put it on the For Sale list.





Breaking down the rough stock with my little panel saw. This and the shooting board gives more square corners (most square? square-er? square-est? Bibliophile, save me!) than my power tools.





I did use a track saw to cut one mortise, then cleaned it up with a chisel. Using this method, the piece (the feet in this case) being mortised consists of two halves that you glue together after the mortise is cut. On the other mortise I used the drill press/chisel approach, which works fine for me.





Here's the mortise in the first foot.





To cut to the chase, here are the feet, legs, and stretcher-to-be. Still some chisel work to do on those leg mortises.





And the dry-assembled base.





Of course it has a top. These two halves have been flattened, but still look a little rough with dried glue on them. I'll run them through the planer, glue 'em up, and finish with a smoother. The idea is to use buttons and screws to attach it.


True power makes no noise - Albert Schweitzer.       It's obvious he was referring to hand tools
Reply
#12
  Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (No, you silly people...)
Congrats on the new grandchildren! Looking forward to seeing the finished table.


Reply
#13
  Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (No, you silly people...)
Very nice, I've always thought that was a great, simple design and want to make one someday.
Reply
#14
  Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (No, you silly people...)
Nice work. Projects like these are the most enjoyable. No expensive wood and surely big little smiles to greet you and the final piece.


Reply
#15
  Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (No, you silly people...)
After some summer traveling, I'm back working on the trestle table. The base is glued up and the cross braces have been cut to fit. They are just dry-fitted in the pic below. Total height of the table will be just over 21".





The top is glued up and flattened. It's finished size will be about 20 1/2" W x 50" L and an inch thick. I have a few little spots of tearout to deal with near those knots, but overall it's in good shape. Ends need to be trimmed as well.





I think I'll use oak buttons to attach the top and a danish oil finish. I was thinking about painting the base, but it should look fine with oil on it.
True power makes no noise - Albert Schweitzer.       It's obvious he was referring to hand tools
Reply
#16
  Re: Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (After some summer tr...)
Congrats on the Grandchildren and I will be following this build.

Also nice to have you posting again.

Arlin
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
Reply
#17
  Re: Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (After some summer tr...)
That is looking really good. And if that’s the quality of the construction lumber you have access to, I’d love to see what the real lumber looks like.

Hail St. Roy, Full of Grace, The Schwarz is with thee.
Blessed art thou among woodworkers, and blessed is the fruit of thy saw, dovetails.
Holy St. Roy, Master of Chisels, pray for us sharpeners now, and at the hour of planing.
Amen.
$300 is a lot of Money!
giant Cypress: Japanese tool blog
Reply
#18
  Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (No, you silly people...)
BaileyNo5 said:



Breaking down the rough stock with my little panel saw. This and the shooting board gives more square corners (most square? square-er? square-est? Bibliophile, save me!) than my power tools.






It's either square or it's not.

Steve S.
------------------------------------------------------
Tradition cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labour.
- T. S. Eliot

Tutorials and Build-Alongs at The Literary Workshop
Reply
#19
  Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by BaileyNo5 (No, you silly people...)
Sweet! I love seeing humble material look like a million bucks. Congrats. and sweeter thoughts for the babies.
Reply
#20
  Re: Re: Trestle Table....With A Twist by Bibliophile 13 ([blockquote]BaileyNo...)
Bibliophile 13 said:


[blockquote]BaileyNo5 said:



Breaking down the rough stock with my little panel saw. This and the shooting board gives more square corners (most square? square-er? square-est? Bibliophile, save me!) than my power tools.






It's either square or it's not.




[/blockquote]

See? I knew you would have the answer!

True power makes no noise - Albert Schweitzer.       It's obvious he was referring to hand tools
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)