Shooting Boards
#11
  Re: (...)
I just completed my first shooting board, and would like to know which plane is recommended. I have Stanley's from #3 through #8, and an assortment of wooden planes as well. I have read that the LV LA Jack Plane is highly recommended, however with anything good, it comes with a pretty steep price. I would appreciate any suggestions on planes, other than specialty planes.

Scott
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#12
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
I have found my LV skew block plane to work very well for smaller work and it's useful for many fitting tasks as well. I can get a really secure grip on it. I prefer it to my LV LAJ even though it's smaller, since the skewed blade makes it work so well with less effort
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#13
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
I use a Bedrock 606. I like the size and handhold area.
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#14
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
I made a hot dog for this one:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.as...&cat=1,41182,52515
I'll try to get a pix of that tomorrow.
Ag
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#15
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
Smoothjazz077 said:


I just completed my first shooting board, and would like to know which plane is recommended. I have Stanley's from #3 through #8, and an assortment of wooden planes as well. I have read that the LV LA Jack Plane is highly recommended, however with anything good, it comes with a pretty steep price. I would appreciate any suggestions on planes, other than specialty planes.

Scott




The sharpest one which you can adjust the blade square to your work while still pushing it through.

I don't use my shooting board much on stock thicker than 1/2" or maybe 5/8" or wider than 4". In other words, it is just for small stock. Larger stuff, learn to plane free-hand to a knife line. Faster than mucking about with the shooting board (freehanding miters still vex me though). So small plane (block or #4) for small shooting board.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#16
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
Lie-Nielsen 62. Hot-dogged. Razor-honed.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#17
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
Smoothjazz077 said:


I just completed my first shooting board, and would like to know which plane is recommended. I have Stanley's from #3 through #8, and an assortment of wooden planes as well. I have read that the LV LA Jack Plane is highly recommended, however with anything good, it comes with a pretty steep price. I would appreciate any suggestions on planes, other than specialty planes.

Scott




Heavier is better.

A #8 is too long, and a #7 is probably too long as well. A #6 would be good, followed by a #5 1/2.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#18
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
If you are going to do a lot of shooting, then I would suggest that you look at a dedicated shooting plane, otherwise a plane with sides square to the sole will work just fine.
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#19
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
If you want to use what you've got, #6 has the mass to do the job well, just be sure it's very sharp. But you can use a #5, #5 1/2 or even smaller bench planes as well. When you want to splurge on a new tool, the skewed LV shooting plane is excellent, mine gets used often.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#20
  Re: Shooting Boards by Smoothjazz077 (I just completed my ...)
I would also try one of the planes you have before you go out and buy a new one. You can shoot with a block plane, a #4, a #5, etc. etc.

I ended up buying a Lie Nielsen #62 low angle plane after trying it out along with the Lie Nielsen #9 miter plane, and the #51 dedicated shooting plane. I found that with the little hotdog handle attachement, the #62 low angle jack plane performed nearly just as well as the miter plane or the #51 at shooting. I use the #62 for shooting, for heavy stock removal with the toothing blade, and for general planing and smoothing, so for me it's very versatile. (I know the Veritas low angle jack is very nice as well and it is even wider which is a benefit for shooting IMO, but I just prefer LN stuff, no knock on Veritas).

Anyway, I would get to work shooting with what you have, and build some stuff, then down the line decide on which one of the more shooting friendly planes suits your needs and your budget.
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