File Card use good or bad on files?
#11
  Re: (...)
I have read forums where some think that using the metal bristles on a card file will damage the file, where others think that the hardened file will not be damaged by the bristles. What do you think??

Andy
I am quickly realizing that I have NO natural talent... But I am trying to fake it.

http://www.creeativewoodworking.net
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#12
  Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by titanxt (I have read forums w...)
I have used a file card for years and have not noticed any issues with my files.

However, I have recently learned a file cleaning trick that is even better at getting out all of the gunk from deep in the teeth. The next time you're at a Chinese restaurant, save a pair of bamboo chopsticks. Rub the end of the chopstick on the file parallel to the teeth. The end of the chopstick will start to conform to the teeth and the fibers will get down into the bottom. You will be amazed how well this works, even on very fine tooth files.

Here is a file that looks pretty clean:




Here it is after a few swipes with the bamboo:


Bob Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In da U.P. of Michigan
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#13
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by enjuneer (I have used a file c...)
Quote:

I have used a file card for years and have not noticed any issues with my files.




Same here.....But for files that are "pinned" with swarf like aluminum that's hard to remove with a file card, I use a "pusher" which is just a scrap piece of brass or copper...it will push everything out of the serrations...use it like the bamboo chopsticks shown above...

To help prevent "pinning" you can rub ordinary blackboard chalk on the serrations..it will load the serrations but will still allow them to do their job.
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#14
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by enjuneer (I have used a file c...)
Good tip, thanks for sharing.


Steve
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#15
  Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by titanxt (I have read forums w...)
Andy

We in the Machine shop and Sheet metal shop used them all the time to clean out the metal filings in them.

A file card was made for that purpose to clean out the grooves. The metal fingers do not need to be used all the time that is why the bristles on the other side to clean out the softer stuff.
Also to help keep the grooves clean you can rub some chalk into it before using.

Arlin
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#16
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by Arlin Eastman (Andy [br] [br]We in ...)
I do have some chalk and use it. Any truth to the internet rumors of chalk drawing moisture and rusting files if left on for long periods?

Thanks!

Andy
I am quickly realizing that I have NO natural talent... But I am trying to fake it.

http://www.creeativewoodworking.net
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#17
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by titanxt (I do have some chalk...)
Quote:

Any truth to the internet rumors of chalk drawing moisture and rusting files if left on for long periods?




I have only heard that on the internet...And I have been chalking files when used on softer metals for more than 60 years, and no worries.... Florida is "Humidity Central"..




Files can rust with or without the chalk because they are bare steel...The worst enemy of a file is another file!!


Never let them contact each other or anything you do not want to file!!.. A good file or rasp deserves a sheath..I make mine out of cardboard and duct tape...
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#18
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by Timberwolf ( [blockquote]Quote:[...)
I bought a piece of brass bar stock just for this purpose. Works great, but I'll remember the chop stick trick too.
Mike

Funny on occasion, embarrassing on average.
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#19
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by KSMike (I bought a piece of ...)
Chop sticks or bamboo skewers work fine if the pinning is not too bad..I've had some that were so tight the skewer just folded




Brass stock pushers works every time..and all "old tyme" machinists kept them in their tool box..
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#20
  Re: Re: File Card use good or bad on files? by titanxt (I do have some chalk...)
The chopstick trick looks like a good one. I'll have to try it.

I don't wish to make a 'pronunciamento' sort of assertion here, but I just wanted to say that I think that the old recommendation to use "chalk" to keep files from clogging refers to "welder's chalk." Blackboard chalk is mostly calcium carbonate with a binder, and is slightly hygroscopic, meaning that it is alkaline, and has to potential to adsorb water vapor and cause rust. Welder's chalk is also known as soapstone or steatite. In my experience, welder's chalk is softer and "fatter" than calcium carbonate chalk. It seems to provide more lubricity at the surface of the file, which aids in the dispersal of metal swarf from the teeth of the file. All of this anecdotal: I haven't made any sort of qualitative measurements or the like. But I think that if you try it, you will perceive the difference yourself. Welder's chalk is inexpensive and readily available. I've used it for years, and have found it to be far more effective in keeping swarf from clogging my files than calcium carbonate chalk. Thank you.
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