Rot Resistant Door
#11
  Re: (...)
I have one entry door that has been on the house about 10 years. The frame and trim are soft and rotting. I stopped by the borg to check on my options. They have two. Another door identical to the current for about $150. Or a special order rot resistant door for $900. The door isn't fancy. Just steel over wood 6 panel with no lites.

I was pondering building a new frame from PVC boards and rehanging the old door on it. Anyone tried this? Thoughts?
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#12
  Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (I have one entry doo...)
Try to figure out why the old door rotted so quickly. A wood door should last longer than 10 years. Once you fix the problem install a new wood door.

If the door rotted this quick, the studs my be going too.

Twinn
Will post for food.
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#13
  Re: Re: Rot Resistant Door by theeviltwinn (Try to figure out wh...)
Agree with Twinn. Better to treat the cause rather than the symptom. Is it possible to build a small entryway roof/cover? Otherwise----rot resistant----IMO fiberglass looks better than steel for a front entry.
Dave
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#14
  Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (I have one entry doo...)
Fixing the problem is next to impossible. It is a walkout basement door that is in the shade. So when it gets wet, it takes a while to dry. There are no studs to rot, it is directly attached to the foundation which is in good shape. Actually it is the wood frame that is rotting. The door slab itself is in very good shape. That is the only reason why I am pondering the possibility of reusing/rehanging it in a new frame.
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#15
  Re: Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (Fixing the problem i...)
Use a steel frame
Phydeaux said "Loving your enemy and doing good for those that hurt you does not preclude killing them if they make that necessary."


Phil Thien

women have trouble understanding Trump's MAGA theme because they had so little involvement in making America great the first time around.

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#16
  Re: Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (Fixing the problem i...)
A 10 year life span in todays contractor grade metal door frame is very common. I imagine the rot you describe to be contained to the lower exterior door jamb and brick mold. Those are repairable and can be done quite easily while currently installed. Google " repair door jamb rot". I've fixed a few using these methods and have had good long term success. The problem seems to be end grain wicking from the sill. leave the jamb cut short and fill with a good exterior caulk like Sashco Big Stretch Caulk.
Any free advice given is worth double price paid.
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#17
  Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (I have one entry doo...)
to get better options of replacements get away from the borg and go to an independant window and door store.
and id suggest lookin at steel.
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#18
  Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (I have one entry doo...)
For 900 dollars I would look at a fiberglass door. Thurmatru or similar.

900 for a steel clad door is crazy, just buy an off the shelf steel stanley door for 100 bucks.
as for assisting in keeping the bottom dry (er) use a drip cap sweep at the base

Joe
Let us not seek the Republican Answer , or the Democratic answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future  John F. Kennedy 



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#19
  Re: Re: Rot Resistant Door by Anthony W (Fixing the problem i...)
Ah! The frame is rotting out because it is in contact with the masonry foundation. That's a tough one.

I don't think PVC trim boards have the strength to hang a door. You could make your own frame out of PT lumber but most PT lumber is nasty, wet and will shrink a ton as it dries. A steel frame might be the best option. Galvanized would be best.

Twinn
Will post for food.
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#20
  Re: Re: Rot Resistant Door by theeviltwinn (Ah! The frame is rot...)
I looked at the window and door stores. I gave up. They offered even less options for the fix. Lots and lots of slab styles, but not much for alternate frames.

It is a wooden frame with a steel door. It is rotting from the bottom up. The door has been replaced once. I think it is a 32" door in 36" opening. So the wooden frame is only in contact with wood and spray insulation (not in direct contact with the foundation). It has (or had) flashing and chalking at the bottom and at the sill.

The other doors on the house are 35 years old. Only this door has been replaced. This is door number two.

If the PVC won't support the door itself. What about building a PVC door frame and then lining it with KDAT PT lumber and hanging the door hinges with extra long screws so it is supported by the 2x wood and not the PVC.
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