Help me choose a welder
#21
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by jteneyck (You should be able t...)
The thing is, I'm not sure how thick of material I'll be welding. Can you give me an example of a project that required thick material?

The tubing I see used for a lot of "shop" type of projects or scrap metal I've seen around tends to have 1/8" to 3/16" walls. Maybe 1/4" max?

Brackets and things like that tend to be pretty thin too...
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#22
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by live4ever (The thing is, I'm no...)
I have a really small O/A torch because the stuff I usually do is a lot easier with a light torch. And my tanks are not big enough to source a big torch anyway. What I find when I want to weld is that I can get enough heat with it, but it does get tiresome. But my experience so far is that I'm happy enough with my ability to weld 1/8" steel that I'm not going to go out and buy a MIG. I have thought that a TIG would be nice, and maybe a buzz box stick. MIG is great for general purpose, but for most things I do around the house, a relatively inexpensive stick welder would work fine.

You can always vee out thicker stuff and go with multiple passes if you have to . Of course, you will hate yourself for a long time afterwards, but the mind magically forgets really unpleasant experiences
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#23
  Re: Help me choose a welder by live4ever (I'd like to get into...)
TIG has one other advantage that many don't consider. The ventilation requirements are negligible compared to other processes.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#24
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by blackhat (TIG has one other ad...)
blackhat said:


TIG has one other advantage that many don't consider. The ventilation requirements are negligible compared to other processes.



How is TIG when it comes to fire hazard?

I have a nice Millermatic MIG buts its permanently in flux wire mode as I must weld outside to avoid a fire hazard in my woodshop. This being Woodnet and all I imagine this is a common situation.

But it does make ventilation irrelevant.

-Mark
If I had a signature, this wouldn't be it.
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#25
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by MKepke ([blockquote]blackhat...)
I suppose that depends on your housekeeping and space but I would say much less risk.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#26
  Re: Help me choose a welder by live4ever (I'd like to get into...)
Part of me thinks I should just hold off for a multi-process machine.

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#27
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by MKepke ([blockquote]blackhat...)
We welded inside our lab full of computers and other electronic equipment with the Lincoln inverter TIG unit. Never had an issue electrically or with fumes, etc. We weren't welding for more than a few seconds every 5 or 10 minutes, but still, it was very clean, both electrically and physically. Out in the general lab where we had the large TIG unit I used a fume exhauster when I could but more often than not I couldn't. There never was a problem with fumes. That's the beauty of TIG. As long as the work is clean and free of paint, etc., there's nothing in the process to create fumes. MIG is just about as clean if you use gas and bare wire. I weld in my garage with my MIG with no issues.

John
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#28
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by live4ever (Part of me thinks I ...)
Really what you should do, and someone mentioned it, is take a welding class first. I know the jr. college here has one. That way you will know more about the type welding you are interested in, if you even like welding, and will let you know more about what machine you will need. I know it is tough to put off a purchase. A class would hopefully keep you from developing bad habits that learning on your own can cause. Bad habits are hard to break once learned. That said I learned on stick and bought a mig a while back. The mig is one of the most frustrating things I have tried to learn. It can give you a good looking weld that holds nothing. I also signed up for a upcoming welding school just to learn mig. With a stick at one time I could weld anything and did a lot of structural steel. Mig just makes me mad.
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#29
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by Pirate (Hobart Handler 140 i...)
Pirate said:


Hobart Handler 140 is a nice 110 volt mig.




ive had mine about 4 years now and its been a great welder.
only thing id say if one is purchased is to check the regulator gage manufacturer. apparently they had a chinese cheapo or a smith. if it isnt a smith gage contact hobart. they sent me a smith and postage paid box to return the other one, which was leaking.
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#30
  Re: Re: Help me choose a welder by tomsteve ([blockquote]Pirate s...)
I wouldn't go below a 140 or so class machine. That would get you in to sheet metal and realistically up to about 1/8" or so thick comfortably. If you really ever plan on doing 1/4 or similar, then you need a 220v machine. A 190 or so class one is a good starting one, and of course you go up from there.

I have a Hobart 187 that I love, but it is a little big for some projects I want to do, and a little small for anything really heavy, though I have rebuilt a few utility trailers with it without any problems. I am in the market for a good 110v machine right now for lighter stuff.

Brew
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