Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction
#11
  Re: (...)
Hi there. I dont think i have ever posted in here. I have a mini lathe coming tomorrow and have yet to buy cutters. I am absolutely at a loss as to what my basic tools should be. Will be turning small on centers, pens, pipes, and the like.

Can someone point me in the direction of a basic list, some artcles, or youtube videos? I was surprised to not see some stickies at the top for this kind ofmstuff.



I was looking at the wood river 'mini' set and the pen set and those look appropriate to my untrained eye, but didnt know if it was just good sense to also have a particular full size tool for general work.
I am fewer tools the better guy. I lke double duty even if it limits me a bit. Anybody see that street corner artisan video where that guy makes a chess set with one tool? Thats knd of my style....

Thanks in advance and let me know if i can offer more info to help with
guidance. Thanks again!!
Reply
#12
  Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by mbmcewen (Hi there. I dont thi...)
Welcome!

I like the Woodriver tools just fine. The problem with the sets is that you always end up with at least a couple tools you will basically never use.

I started out with a set of Benjamin's Best (PSI sells them, I think.). They worked great for me. After I figured out what I needed and how I like to turn, I re-ground several of them to make tools I wanted.

If you have a good idea what you need, I would recommend buying individual tools. Otherwise, a set can be a good idea. Worked for me! Also, IMO, the mini tools are too small. I'd get the regular size ones.

My advice is to start with inexpensive tools. Depending on your experience with grinding, you'll turn a lot of your first tools to dust anyway.

I'm slow, but I do poor work.
Reply
#13
  Re: Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by jerickson (Welcome![br][br]I li...)
Yes i def dont want to spend a ton out of the gate and yes i totally get you about not using some tools in a set. Im good with buying individual tools that i need most.

Thanks for the tip about the mini set. I read that 1/8 gouge is just about useless...

I will check out benjamins best. I figure i want to be able to rough out square stock, make graceful sweeping arcs....no beads bunched up...not my style, and maybe a parting tool for cutting in at 90 degrees and cutting in clean v shaped flutes.

I would have to say i believe my goal in the beginning will be to turn objects that actually look a lot like the handle of most turning tool.... Hmph how bout that irony

Thanks again.
Matt
Reply
#14
  Re: Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by jerickson (Welcome![br][br]I li...)
Man i just checked out the psi benjamins best tools and they look like the way to go. Very nice price!!! And like you said ill probably burn through some of them quickly.

Thanks!
Reply
#15
  Re: Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by mbmcewen (Man i just checked o...)
Glad to help! I bet several others will chime in tomorrow, so you'll have plenty of options to consider. :-)
I'm slow, but I do poor work.
Reply
#16
  Re: Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by jerickson (Glad to help! I bet ...)
I think you got great advice already. The Benjamin's Best set is a great starter set and I know several accomplished turners who've never needed much more at all.
" The founding fathers weren't trying to protect citizens' rights to have an interesting hobby." I Learn Each Day 1/18/13

http://www.RUSTHUNTER.com
Reply
#17
  Re: Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by Gregory of Sherwood Forest (I think you got grea...)
Very good to hear that second gregory.

Cant wait!!!!
Reply
#18
  Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by mbmcewen (Hi there. I dont thi...)
To get the feel and flavor of turning, start with spindle works. Buy a 1" roughing gouge, 1/2" spindle gouge and parting tool. Your big cost will be a sharpening system, i.e. low speed grinder, wolverine jigs coupled with a grinder, TORMECK wet machine etc. You gotta learn to sharpen, and I mean really sharpen, your tools. Have fun.
Reply
#19
  Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by mbmcewen (Hi there. I dont thi...)
This website, woodturning videos has links to several excellent videos and articles. There is a special section just for beginning turners. The videos by Brian Havens are especially good.
Steve K


Reply
#20
  Re: Turning newb... Please point me in the right direction by mbmcewen (Hi there. I dont thi...)
Manufacturers have been offering sets of basic tools for years. There's no brag in them, but they always seem to contain what you'll need for basic work. They all contain a parting tool, two or three size gouges, and a skew, all of which will find use whatever you're turning. They also contain a scraper or two, which some find handy. With the BB sets, this seems closest to what I'd get.
https://www.pennstateind.com/mm5/merchan...ode=LCHSS8

Or perhaps
https://www.pennstateind.com/store/LCSIXW.html

I would make a beading tool (straight chisel) out of the scraper, because it's handy from rounding down to finishing a pen blank. Other tools will do it, too.

As for articles, there are all kinds of famous names showing how they do things, but it boils down, upon examination, to what's said here. http://www.turningtools.co.uk/wtintro/wtintro.html

There's a lot of misinformation out there, so use your good sense as your best tool. Good sense wants you to stand out of the way, keep the rest up close, and cut as the wood wishes to be cut. Downhill. That's scripture, the rest is commentary.

Make some shavings.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)