Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look...
#11
  Re: (...)
One of the things about chain saws is that you have to service them. They tend to move all move the place while you work on them. And, many times you really do not have to remove the bar. I decided to combine my WW vise with a special clamp to lock the saw in place. Here's my clamping invention:





I used two lengths of 4/4 white oak for the jaws, pivoted at the bottom with bolts held with lock nuts and lips at the top to grab the saw's bar. A pair of compression springs near the bottom open the jaws automatically. The saw sits on the 1/2" thick L-shaped shelf (about 5" wide and 15" long) and can be switched both directions in the WW vise:





This clamp allows the chain to move for file sharpening. The shroud, carburetor cover, muffler, and pull cord cover can all be removed for servicing. I've used this with saws all the way up to the big Stihl MS660 and all the way down to the small MS170. Other brands of saws work as well.

The WW vise locks it all in place and the saw is held like a rock. The bottom rests on the WW vise's guide bars so that when you release the vise to remove the saw, the clamp opens up but stays in place.

Thanks for looking.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#12
  Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Edwin Hackleman (One of the things ab...)
When I saw the first picture my initial thought was he should have extend the base out both sides so the saw could be reversed. Didn't occur to me to just reverse the whole works in the vise. Nice job! Looks like a useful tool.
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#13
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Phil S. (When I saw the first...)
Thanks, Phil. I did forget to mention that the lips on the jaws need a slight vertical taper and likely some hand shaping to ensure that they grip flat to the bar. I also used quarter sawn oak for flatness. I imagine plywood would also work, but I like the look of oak.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#14
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Edwin Hackleman (Thanks, Phil. I did ...)
For any interested, the same result can be had with a machinists vise and some pads on the jaws to prevent damage to the bar. No other accessories needed. For one who only has a woodworking vise though, the above is an excellent accessory.

Another thing to note. With this setup, it may be tempting to remove the clutch cover. You will then compromise the entire system so pay attention and just don't use it if you need to get at the clutch, sprocket, chain, oiler, etc. I know this was already mentioned but if you work on chainsaws a lot, it will happen.
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When something has to be done, no one knows how to do it.  When they "pay" you to do it, they become "experts".
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#15
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Axehandle (For any interested, ...)
The same result will not be obtained. A machinist vise will not substitute for my invention. There is no support given to the saw's case when the bar is locked in a machinist vise. When locked in a machinist vise, the bar must then handle all the force from the saw's body weight and any added force that the service man exerts on the case while working. You will even see deflection and more wobble as you work.

I doubt anyone would remove the clutch cover if the bar is clamped as shown here. Even if they did, the case remains supported by the shelf while the bar remains locked in place. Axehandle, you sound a bit like someone who has removed the clutch cover while your saw's bar is clamped in a machinist vise. I imagine many have done the same, and that's one of the reasons why I designed this.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#16
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Edwin Hackleman (The same result will...)
It is a good invention and a logical solution to the problem.
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When something has to be done, no one knows how to do it.  When they "pay" you to do it, they become "experts".
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#17
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Axehandle (It is a good inventi...)
Thank you for pointing out that the machinist vise is a potential substitute. However, that has sometimes resulted in the power head dropping to the floor, especially when there is only one bar stud and nut holding the bar to the power head.

Normally, the service man can see this coming as the bar nut is loosened, but now and then the phone rings.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#18
  Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Edwin Hackleman (One of the things ab...)
Stihl is on my "to buy" list... Poulan is OK, but...
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#19
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by MikeSmith (Stihl is on my "to b...)
There is no comparison between Poulan and Stihl chain saws these days. Stihl wins hands down. Yes, Stihl saws are more expensive, but they last and last and are worth repairing. Parts are available both from the dealers and from aftermarket suppliers, even for saw models that were made as many as 30 years ago.

Better competitors to Stihl are Husqvarna, Dolmar, and Echo. I have repaired all of these brands and a few others that have gone by the wayside. Through the years I have made several tools, parts, and accessories in my shop to repair and enhance chain saws. My woodworking skills have made much of this possible.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#20
  Re: Re: Got a Chain Saw? Take a Look... by Edwin Hackleman (There is no comparis...)
Might of been tongue in cheek. I don't think anyone would be too serious in thinking a modern day Poulan is better than any Stihl. Then again, whatever fits your needs and budget....

Here is an MS 440 that was bought in 2002 by a tree company I worked for at the time. I eventually inherited it 6 years later. I used it several times a month for freelance tree cutting work for the next 5 years. It has gone through 3 mufflers and a carburetor in that time and countless air and fuel filters, bars, chains, starter rope, triggers, throttle linkages, brakes, clutches, sprockets, engine mounts, etc.

Still starts with no less than 4 pulls if you actually follow the rules when choking. Keep good gas in it (non ethanol) and good oil and it will last and last. If it ever gives out, that is a good excuse for a big bore kit.

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When something has to be done, no one knows how to do it.  When they "pay" you to do it, they become "experts".
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