Laminated Plane Blades ?
#11
  Re: (...)
I have a Canadian made Stanley #3 with an odd blade. By the date on the blade, made in January 1947. Roxton Pond works dated plane blades. When I sharpened it, half the face was dull, the cutting half came up mirror shiny. Were they being cheap with carbon steel, or was this deluxe feature?
A man of foolish pursuits
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#12
  Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Downwindtracker2 (I have a Canadian ma...)
Stanley in the USA made their plane blades that way in the 20's and 30's. I think they did it to save money but they tried to use it as a selling feature. I'm surprised to hear of it in the late 40's. Perhaps Canada was given some old stock to use up?

Many Stanley fans like the laminated blades, including me; but they tend to be rather thin.
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#13
  Re: Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Mike Brady (Stanley in the USA m...)
They tend, in my experience, to retain edge better. Likely because they paid a bit more attention to the laminated "good" stuff, and likely because they might have been able to harden it a bit more because of the lamination. I'm not a metal guy, so that's just speculation, but most 19th century plane irons were laminated as the better steel was more expensive. The metal guys will know better. I've not seen one that late either.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#14
  Re: Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Admiral (They tend, in my exp...)
I like these blades; they are faster to sharpen because of the part that is milder steel. I think it was a matter of quality, not cost.

Warren
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#15
  Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Downwindtracker2 (I have a Canadian ma...)
See here

If you soak the blade in vinegar (I like white because it's got fewer extraneous compounds, but any vinegar should work) for 24 hours, you'll find the tool steel part gets dark black, the rest gets shiny. Wash it thoroughly, pat dry, lube heavily with WD-40 to soak up any residual water. You'll get rid of any rust on it at the same time.
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#16
  Re: Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Bill_Houghton (See [url=http://too...)
Citric Acid can give a similar effect as vinegar also.
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#17
  Re: Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Bill_Houghton (See [url=http://too...)
Interesting, I'll have to check a couple of blades I have from two Canadian made jacks, a '32 Bailey and a '38 Bedrock. They both had sweathart on them. I had swapped the blades and chipbreakers for LV ones.
A man of foolish pursuits
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#18
  Re: Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Bill_Houghton (See [url=http://too...)
Bill_Houghton said:


See here

If you soak the blade in vinegar (I like white because it's got fewer extraneous compounds, but any vinegar should work) for 24 hours, you'll find the tool steel part gets dark black, the rest gets shiny. Wash it thoroughly, pat dry, lube heavily with WD-40 to soak up any residual water. You'll get rid of any rust on it at the same time.




Don't walk away and let it soak for days, thinking that it is just vinegar-what harm can it cause?

As a rookie, years ago,I destroyed a Sargent 309 blade this way. The soft metal just started to disappear. Still looking for an original replacement.
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#19
  Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by Downwindtracker2 (I have a Canadian ma...)
Older plane blades, (irons), are laminated. It's a good thing. Just be aware of the feature. Never soak a plane blade too long, regardless of it's status of laminated or not. Be glad you have a laminated blade. The laminated piece at the business end of the blade will sharpen up just great!
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#20
  Re: Re: Laminated Plane Blades ? by wayne anderson (Older plane blades, ...)
LIL and an observation.

For the life of me, I don't know why anyone soaks tools. Elbow grease and some abrasive does the job nicely.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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