Handcut DT ?
#11
  Re: (...)
Those of you purists that cut DTs by hand, do you care if they are symmetrical or not? Just wondering. I don't necessarily spend the time measuring.
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#12
  Re: Handcut DT ? by Halfathumb (Those of you purists...)
I think dovetail spacing should be done with intention but not necessarily by measurement. Sometimes you want near-perfect symetry, other times you want to convey a different look.

I also don't think hand cut DT's are the exclusive domain of "purists." It's a classic joint that has been used for thousands of years because it is strong and attractive.

On something like kitchen or shop cabinets I'll use my Leigh jig but for furniture, I usually hand cut them for a more refined look.
If I had 8 hours to cut down a tree, I'd do it in 15 minutes with a chainsaw and drink beer the other 7:45 hrs.
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#13
  Re: Handcut DT ? by Halfathumb (Those of you purists...)
I try to make mine symmetrical. If they show, I spend more time trying to get them right. If they won't show, not so much. It's not that hard to make them symmetrical if you spend just a little time laying them out properly before you start cutting.
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#14
  Re: Handcut DT ? by Halfathumb (Those of you purists...)
Halfathumb said:


Those of you purists that cut DTs by hand, do you care if they are symmetrical or not? Just wondering. I don't necessarily spend the time measuring.



There's always some variation by hand, but close to symmetrical is nice. That's barring intentional asymmetry. Do you know how to walk them off with calipers? That method makes it quick and easy if you are using uniform spacing.

PWW - Megan shows how
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#15
  Re: Handcut DT ? by Halfathumb (Those of you purists...)
For show, yes. For function only, not important.

I wouldn't necessarily classify all hand cut dovetailers as "purists". A purist would be someone who believes hmust do everything in the traditional method. I'm a hybrid woodworker. I hand cut dovetails because you can't do the kind of dovetails I do with power tools. If you want to see dovetails done really well, go down to the Hand Tools forum and check out some of Derek Cohen's recent posts. I don't think you can get much better than Derek, and you can't do that with a machine.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#16
  Re: Handcut DT ? by Halfathumb (Those of you purists...)
My dovetails are close to symmetrical. I cut mine entirely by eye though meaning all I do is strike a base line and start cutting. Mine are fairly consistent but obviously there will be some small variation in angle and spacing which is the way it should be in a reproduction piece.
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#17
  Re: Re: Handcut DT ? by AHill (For show, yes. For ...)
AHill said:


For show, yes. For function only, not important.





This

If it is casework that will be covered they can be rough and still functional, but on a drawer side where you will see it some punkin teeth are not too attractive.

The DT is the classic drawer joint, and even, symmetrical , pins and tails are a standard. There are a number of joints just as effective at holding together, and some have more glue surface, such as finger joints. Plenty of choices, plenty of looks. If you are your customer you are free to choose. If someone else is the customer it's best to make what they want/expect.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#18
  Re: Handcut DT ? by Halfathumb (Those of you purists...)
If they are perfectly symmetrical they loose the hand cut cred. I like the center tail wider than the rest,
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#19
  Re: Re: Handcut DT ? by Shovel Man (If they are perfectl...)
Why do the hand cut purists always leave the scribe line? Looks like a forgotten tool mark.
Gunners Mate, 1st Class, A long time ago...
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#20
  Re: Re: Handcut DT ? by Superglide (Why do the hand cut ...)
Superglide said:


Why do the hand cut purists always leave the scribe line? Looks like a forgotten tool mark.



Not always, but yeah, often. I think some people like the look. Others use a deep scribe mark to register the chisel, and after that just how much hand planing do you want to do? So they leave most of it. I bet there's a big bunch of dovetailers that never put much thought into it one way or another.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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