So I've got these drill bits
#99
  Re: So I've got these drill bits by Stwood_ (that my grandfather ...)
So the original problem was a drill smoking and blowout. An oil hole drill should eliminate the smoking and help with the blowout.


There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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  Re: RE: So I've got these drill bits by Redman (So the original prob...)
Funny.
Those drills are for deep holes in steel.  They connect to a chuck that has an oil feed.  Totally weird when a woodworker first sees one, but they've been around a good while.  Flushes the steel chips out of the hole.

   
Side view

   
Front of drill bit showing the oil holes.

   
Back of the drill showing threaded hole for the oil line.
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  Re: So I've got these drill bits by Stwood_ (that my grandfather ...)
Well Bob do you have any ideas on rigging one of those up on the average home drill press? For instance if I needed to drill a hole deeper than or through something that is more than 3x's the drill diameter. I've read somewhere that deeper than that you begin to have trouble clearing the shaving from the hole.
There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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  Re: RE: So I've got these drill bits by Redman (Well Bob do you have...)
Routine procedure is drill one drill diameter deep and withdraw the bit (clearing the chips)  and go down again.  Usually on the first pass, one can go down two diameters.  The bigger the hole, the more secure the work and drilling machine needs to be.

When we make things, drilling holes is part of what we do.  Procedures and tooling vary from good, better, and best, depending on the maker's needs and budget.   We can cut the head off of a nail, chuck it up, and drill a hole with that if we want to.

Wood is spongy, fibrous and unpredictable.  For holes 1" and under, a good brad point bit with very well defined cutting spurs does best when doing cross-grain cutting.  Metal working tips work a little better when drilling in end grain but have a tendency to drift a little more than a brad point.

For holes in wood 5/8" diameter and larger, I personally prefer a multi spur bit with a 6" long, 1/2" diameter shank but those are hard to find these days.
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  Re: So I've got these drill bits by Stwood_ (that my grandfather ...)
How do you know what RPM to run the drill and one you use one speed for a soft wood and another for a hardwood.
There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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  Re: RE: So I've got these drill bits by Redman (How do you know what...)
(05-20-2019, 10:09 AM)Redman Wrote: How do you know what RPM to run the drill and one you use one speed for a soft wood and another for a hardwood.

I pretty much do it like most have done it in the past.  Make a test hole or two if the speed seems to be in question.  A few trips down the wrong path is usually enough OJT for most woodworkers.

Metal drilling is a different world that's well covered in many metalworking forums.
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  Re: RE: So I've got these drill bits by Bob Vaughan ([quote='Redman' pid=...)
(05-20-2019, 12:17 PM)Bob Vaughan Wrote: Metal drilling is a different world that's well covered in many metalworking forums.

Not much different actually. The hardness and abrasiveness of the work piece may dictate the drill speed although with wood it isn't so critical.
There is no such thing as too much horsepower, free lunch or spare change ~ anonymous

87% of people say their mental health is good to excellent. The rest are sane enough to know they are lying. ~ anonymous
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  Re: RE: So I've got these drill bits by Redman ([quote='Bob Vaughan'...)
Here's a photo that ended up showing the details of a well ground wood-boring drill bit.  This is a 5/16" bit that I ground in less than five minutes.  I was detailing some 1-3/4" toy wheels and wanted a photo of the setup.  The outside cutting spurs define the hole quite well and minimizes tearout on the other side.

   
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