So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother...
#21
  Re: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (I thought I'd look f...)
An iterim status report:  a 50° ramp ground on the business end of the chip breaker.
Stay tuned for more exciting developments.


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#22
Wink    Re: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (I thought I'd look f...)
Is that a Bronze 4 1/2 you got there Phillip. Did you get it new?

Make sure you mark that back bevel iron...I have got a few and its easy to get them mixed up.
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#23
  Re: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (I thought I'd look f...)
Here's what a bronze #4 1/2 looks like with a closed up chipbreaker: nice, straight shavings. Nothing curly to be seen.

I swapped out the 50 degree frog on mine for a 45 degree frog.




Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#24
  Re: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (I thought I'd look f...)
OK, minor progress. I put togeher the jig to set the chipbreaker back from the blade edge.  I found that if I edge jointed
the edge of the feeler gauge stock (similar to edge jointing a card scraper, but with abrasives instead of a file) I got better, positive, repeatable
registration of the chipbreaker.  More exciting results to follow: stay tuned.


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#25
  Re: RE: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (OK, minor progress. ...)
"I swapped out the 50 degree frog on mine for a 45 degree frog."

Question for Derek: Why did you do this? Shouldn't the steeper angle be better for hardwoods and tricky grain?
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#26
  Re: RE: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by overland ("I swapped out the 5...)
One method to prevent tearout is a higher cutting angle (higher bed, back bevel, or higher bevel on a BU plane). Of course, this does need to be at a high enough angle to make a difference. On the Australian woods I use, the 50 degree frog that came standard with the LN Anniversary #4 1/2 is not high enough. I first swapped this out for a 55 degree frog, but this was also not high enough. Plus it made the plane very hard to push. It ended up on a shelf.

A few years ago I learned to use the chipbreaker to control tearout. With this method, the lower frog may be used, which is desirable as the lower cutting angle leaves a clearer finish. My Veritas Custom #4 has a 42 degree frog.

So the LN #4 1/2 now has a 45 degree frog, a closed up chipbreaker, and planes interlocked grain beautifully.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#27
  Re: RE: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (OK, minor progress. ...)
[quote pid='7376717' dateline='1478024815']
OK, minor progress. I put togeher the jig to set the chipbreaker back from the blade edge.  I found that if I edge jointed
the edge of the feeler gauge stock (similar to edge jointing a card scraper, but with abrasives instead of a file) I got better, positive, repeatable
registration of the chipbreaker.  More exciting results to follow: stay tuned.



[/quote]

I wonder how many try to measure using factory finished corners on feeler gauges? Kinda like standing in Silicone lubricant....
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#28
  Re: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (I thought I'd look f...)
Status report:  with a 50° bevel on the chipbreaker and no backbevel on the blade, using the setup jig above, I got very
good results, roughly about the same as un-modified chipbreaker with a 7.5° backbevel on the iron.  It is easier to simply
set the chipbreaker close than to futz with the backbevel.  I have not tried  the modified chipbreaker combined with the backbevel: I am assuming
roughly the same clearance between the edge of the chipbreaker and the point of transition on the back of the blade where it goes from beveled to
flat.  Stay tuned for more exciting developments.  


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#29
  Re: RE: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (Status report:  with...)
Again, for Derek: You say you have high angle smoothers with blades set at 60-62 degrees, but also at least one smoother--your LN 4 1/2 --set at regular pitch. And if the chipbreaker is set close, you get smoother results with this one than using a higher angle blade. So under what conditions do you use the high-angle smoothers? If you get smoother results with standard pitch-- 45 degrees--and a close-set chip breaker, why use a high angle smoother at all?
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#30
  Re: So, Before I Run Out and Invest in an Overstuffed Smoother... by Philip1231 (I thought I'd look f...)
I have a number of two piece Clifton chipbreakers and find it difficult to put a 50degree bevel on the smaller front part....first to measure it and then to hold it since its so short. I also am not able to get my chipbreakers as close to the edge of the iron  as many advise due to the rounded corners on the blade.
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