Question For Folks That Spin Things
#11
  
I'm not a turner, which will become obvious shortly!

I need to find something that I can screw to the bottom of a 2  3/4" cylinder so I can chuck in my drill press on low speed and sand it.  I have no idea what this is called or where to find it.  I've looked around on some turning supply sites but when you don't know what to call the dam thing it doesn't provide much for results.

Any thoughts or suggestions for what I need???
Mike


If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room!

But not today...
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#12
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
What's wrong with just using a bolt run through a piece of scrap wood? Counterbore and epoxy the head of the bolt into the counterbore, then screw the scrap wood to your cylinder.

The only thing that comes to mind that would fit in a drill chuck is a sanding pad, that might be too flexible.
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#13
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
That is my fall back if there is no device manufactured to do this.  I was hoping there was something readily available in the turning world.   Based on my looking, there doesn't seem to be anything out there.
Mike


If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room!

But not today...
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#14
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
Google jumbo chuck screw, and maybe that is what you could use
Have fun and take care
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#15
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
IF your drill press has a 2MT you should be able to pop it out (just like in a lathe tailstock).
Get a drill press arbor like this which is threaded for chucks.  Drill and appropriate size hole and thread it on.
"Work arbors" are about the same but have a long threaded portion.
A scrap board underneath with a nail will give support much like a dead center in a lathe tailstock.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2MT-SHANK-TO-1-2...SwHoFXr58z
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#16
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
If your drill press can handle a 5/8" rod (or you could machine a 5/8" rod down like they do a drill bit for smaller chucks), then you could use a Shopsmith faceplate.

The smallest one that Shopsmith sells these days
http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catal...plates.htm
is a bit large for your needs. They do say that it will handle down to 2-3/8" diameter.

There used to be someone who made really nice aluminum faceplates and they made small ones (including for the Shopsmith). I am not sure if they are still in business, though, and I am blanking on their name. Sigh Seems like it might have been Don Pencil.

If you go that route, you would need to file a flat on the rod where the SS set screw holds the faceplate onto the rod.

Alternatively, you could thread a rod to match the spindle size for a small faceplate.

Craft Supply has a 2" aluminum faceplate on sale.


You would have to do a 1"x8tpi rod, though.

There are small facelpates available for smaller spindles but they are harder to find than my google skills at the moment.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#17
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
(12-04-2016, 05:10 PM)NCPaladin Wrote: IF your drill press has a 2MT you should be able to pop it out (just like in a lathe tailstock).
Get a drill press arbor like this which is threaded for chucks.  Drill and appropriate size hole and thread it on.
"Work arbors" are about the same but have a long threaded portion.
A scrap board underneath with a nail will give support much like a dead center in a lathe tailstock.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2MT-SHANK-TO-1-2...SwHoFXr58z

I have no idea what you are talking about but I do have what NC linked to and you can borrow it if you wish.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#18
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
Run out issues do tend to add up, but you could use a 5/8" rod (with a flat filed for the set screw) with a
SS to 1"x8 adapter

and then use any faceplate with a 1"x8 thread.

The EasyWood 2" aluminum faceplate would probably be a good choice for your application.

Biggest issues:
1) does your drillpress turn in the right direction to tighten the threads, and
2) centering your work piece on the faceplate during mounting.

Side note: you do NOT need to use all of the holes. You do need to use enough to safely secure your work piece.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#19
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
FWIW, I built a face plate out of 3/4" ply with a 3/8" carriage bolt through the center of a 3" circle and liberal use of epoxy.  I'm waiting for the epoxy to cure before I chuck it into the drill press to make it circular.  The items I need to sand are 2 3/4" in diameter so they should center up on a 3" circle fairly well.  We'll see.

This may come to nothing but it's worth a try.  The idea of a lathe face plate would be perfect but my 17" General Int'l Drill press isn't going to accommodate a 1 or 1 1/4" rod.

I've got another half-baked idea brewing in my head for another way to do this but I need to think about it some more.

Thanks to all who gave me ideas!!  Much appreciated.
Mike


If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room!

But not today...
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#20
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
Maybe I'm not properly seeing the situation, but could you just screw a hanger bolt into the bottom of your cylinder and chuck the other (bolt) end into your drill? It may tend to unscrew on it's own as you sand, but I'm thinking there are ways to manage that.
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