Question For Folks That Spin Things
#18
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
(12-04-2016, 08:19 PM)gMike Wrote: This may come to nothing but it's worth a try.  The idea of a lathe face plate would be perfect but my 17" General Int'l Drill press isn't going to accommodate a 1 or 1 1/4" rod.
What you have set up should be fine as long as what you are sanding is not too tall and you let the sandpaper do the work.

If it doesn't work out, then the 5/8" rod with either a faceplate sized for a 5/8" smooth (ShopSmith) spindle or the adapter that I linked above should give you options.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#19
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
mike, is there a limit to what size hole you can put in the end of the item your sanding?
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#20
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
The hole is anywhere from 1 7/8" to 2 1/4" depending on what she wants. I tried to stuff a pneumatic sanding drum in the hole and spin it but it was almost impossible to get it centered (wobble).

Angus, long time no see! Good to see you back posting. Hope all is well!
Mike


If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room!

But not today...
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#21
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
eh, you know how it is, 1 foot in the grave the other on a banana peal lol. Would a woodworm screw work? linky as was suggested earlier, screw a centered hole in the end for the screw put the head in the DP. Drive a nail through a board clamp it to the table using the nail as a dead center you could move the bottom board until th nail is centered then clamp it down. Give the quill some downward force to set the nail in the end of the work and off you go. I have a couple of woodworms I haven't used in probably 20 years. If you think the idea will work I'll find them, make sure the head fits in my DP and send you one.
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#22
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
Thanks for the offer.  Progress report - don't use epoxy if you are going to sand with a fine grit.  The piece gets hot enough to melt the epoxy.  Version #2 of the home made faceplate doesn't use epoxy and works "fairly" well.  I'll give you a yell if it doesn't work out.

Thanks again.
Mike


If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room!

But not today...
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#23
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
(12-06-2016, 09:01 PM)gMike Wrote: Thanks for the offer.  Progress report - don't use epoxy if you are going to sand with a fine grit.  The piece gets hot enough to melt the epoxy.  Version #2 of the home made faceplate doesn't use epoxy and works "fairly" well.  I'll give you a yell if it doesn't work out.

Thanks again.

If it's getting hot enough to melt epoxy, you are applying too much pressure while sanding.  Let the grit do the work.  Light pressure is sufficient.  Easier on the wood (fewer or no deep scratches) and easier on the sandpaper.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#24
  Re: Question For Folks That Spin Things by gMike (I'm not a turner, wh...)
Epoxy also continues to get harder (and stronger) for quite a while after it gets solid.  You can handplane it as soon as it's solid, but in my experience it sands better after a few days.  Of course the time varies with the type of epoxy, but there are very large changes taking place after it's dry.
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