Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc.
#11
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Just wondering what works best (and simplest) for removing light rust from pliers, wrenches, Vise-Grips, etc.  I don't need to go full-on electrolysis tank for a full restoration here; these are "user" garage tools (in some cases with rubber grips) that have developed some surface rust that I'd like to nip in the bud before the rust gets deeper. 

Spray with WD-40 and scrub with steel wool?  Or is there something quicker and easier? And after I am done, is there a recommended product to spray on such hand tools to keep the rust at bay but not leave me covered in grease/oil the next time I go to use my adjustable wrenches?

Thanks!
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#12
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
Try 3 in 1 oil and rub with steel wool.  If that's not gettin it done, a quick soak in evaporust is very effective with very little downside other than cost.  You can re-use the liquid though, just pour it back in the jar.
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#13
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
For light rust, a two hour soak in Evaporust will take of it with little labor. Just rinse off in hot water and thoroughly dry, followed by oiling or waxing.

Amazon has the gallon size of Evaporust on sale for under $18 right now. If you have Amazon Prime, then shipping is free.

$18 Gallon of Evaporust at Amazon
Bob Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In da U.P. of Michigan
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#14
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
Quick spritz of boeshield rust free then wd and oil.


Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

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#15
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
My $.02 is a ScocthBrite pad and a little WD-40, but any of the suggestions will work just fine.
Currently a smarta$$ but hoping to one day graduate to wisea$$
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#16
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
Depends. My north Florida shop can get pretty dang humid--even with the dehumidifier going 24x7. Unless the rust is bothersome, I just leave it. Sometimes sweat drops on tools and that needs attention. Salty sweat will rust and pit in no time. I dry the sweat with a paper towel and rub the tool with 3 in 1 oil. When I find objectionable rust, I usually sand it off with a scrap of 220 AO sandpaper because that paper is all over the shop. After sanding, 3 in 1 or Johnsons paste wax.
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#17
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
Extra fine wire wheel from LV.  Almost gives you a polished finish.  They tend to wear out somewhat quickly, but they are cheap enough.  Best I've found for this sort of work.






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#18
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
(01-03-2017, 02:38 PM)law_kid Wrote: Just wondering what works best (and simplest) for removing light rust from pliers, wrenches, Vise-Grips, etc.  I don't need to go full-on electrolysis tank for a full restoration here; these are "user" garage tools (in some cases with rubber grips) that have developed some surface rust that I'd like to nip in the bud before the rust gets deeper. 

Spray with WD-40 and scrub with steel wool?  Or is there something quicker and easier? And after I am done, is there a recommended product to spray on such hand tools to keep the rust at bay but not leave me covered in grease/oil the next time I go to use my adjustable wrenches?

Thanks!
................
24hr vinegar soak works wonders...cheap and effective for light rust..white or Apple Cider vinegar works equally well...rinse with water and let dry or blow with hair dryer..then use any type of oil to prevent future rust..but remember you will probably have to wipe with oil after each work session because the acid and salt on bare steel or cast iron from your skin can cause rust big time. Old Tyme German machinists called it "poison hands"......
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#19
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
You can never stop rust unless you like working with slippery oily tools.

I just sand off the loose rust, oil it and wipe it down good until it isn't .....too oily. Then I just use them.
"There are no strangers- only friends I haven't met.
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#20
  Re: Removing light rust on pliers, wrenches, etc. by law_kid (Just wondering what ...)
I've used all of the above methods and I'm generally in the extra-fine wire wheel camp.  That said, I had an arbor/motor setup available which I've since dedicated for this purpose (with a shopvac) and it seems the fastest/least messy overall.  Think I got my current wheel at Home Depot.  Have used brass plated (not from Lee Valley) and found that it could leave some brass/yellow behind.  It cleaned off easily with fine wool and otherwise did just fine.  Without the shopvac, dust was a problem.  Proper care must be used as wire wheels shed and can also snatch a tool/small part right from your hand and send it just about anywhere (DAMHIKT). 

My biggest complaint with Vinegar/Citric Acid/Evaporust (which all get into places that the wheel can't) was simply the extra mess/work of keeping liquid chemicals around and in a soak tub/pan/bucket then dumping the crud and keeping one set of rags for wiping off chemical and another set of rags for wiping on oil, etc. etc.   If I had a utility sink of some sort, I'd maybe think differently but I don't and having a pan half full of something on the floor of my too cluttered shop did not help overall. 

Good luck,
A.
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