Leg options
#9
  
I'm about to start a bedroom suite for my daughter. She wants walnut and the design is calling for 3" posts. Since I can't find anything that thick around here I'll be gluing up the posts. I see 2 options.

Option 1 - Glue 2 8/4 walnut pieces together and then glue a 1/8" - 1/4" piece on the sides with the seams.
or
Option 2 - Glue up a cheaper wood like poplar for a core and then glue walnut to the outsides.

The second option is cheaper since I won't need as much thick stock but is there any advantage to option 1?

Cliff
You can only be young once
but you can be immature forever.
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#10
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
Option 3: bevel all the edges of walnut and glue up the posts. Basically leaving the middle hollow. Like how they make legs for craftsman pieces so they show 1/4sawn on all faces. Not sure if that would work with your joinery though.

Of options 1 and 2 I would go with number one because it will probably be less work.
-Marc

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#11
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
option 3 glue more thinner (cheaper than thick) stock together then cover up the gluelines 

It matters not if there is one glue line or 5 if you do it this way 

On option 2 if I was overlaying I would not even bother with solid stock I would just use ply or MDF 

JMO/E


Joe
There are ways of changing peoples minds that are more effective than others but ultimately they all fall short 



“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance,”  “It is the illusion of knowledge.” Stephen Fry
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#12
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
Joe,

Your suggestion makes a good point. I can put the less than stellar pieces inside and have less waste. And the movement would all match.

Cliff
You can only be young once
but you can be immature forever.
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#13
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
Option 3A, a modification of WaterlooMarc's suggestion: make hollow legs of 3/4" walnut using a lock miter bit on your router table. The lock miter joint is very strong and, unlike a plain miter joint, clamping is a snap. The glue lines run along the corners so they all but disappear. All the boards are face grain, so there's no worry about grain orientation. The setup for lock miter bits is a little fiddly, but once you get it dialed in, you can run all your leg stock at once and you're done.


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#14
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
Hank,

Thanks. I've used lock miters on other projects.







I'd like to try something else for this project.

Cliff
You can only be young once
but you can be immature forever.
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#15
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
I believe the hollow leg option would be problematical for a leg with connecting joinery. Strength of joinery might be compromised.
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#16
  Re: Leg options by cpolubin (I'm about to start a...)
On a Stickley morris chair they glue mitered pieces around a center post. The leg comes up through the arm so you can see the joinery. It allows quartersawn figure on all four sides.
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