Using Pontypool
#10
  
A friend of mine gave me his great grandfathers Stanley no. 8 yesterday, it had been sitting in his mothers basement for decades. I think its a Type 8-9 based on the Stanley plane study. Its mechanically in good condition and the body is solid, but the japanning on the body is shot. As part of the restoration I'd like to use Pontypool for the japanning, but I've never used it before and wonder if anyone here has any experience with it. 

Searching on this site revealed this excellent thread on different approaches for painting, but no details on using Pontypool.

Any pointers on usage would be greatly appreciated.  

TIA, Steve
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#11
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontypool_(film)

Confused
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#12
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
As much as replacing japanning appeals to me, in truth I found it to be frustrating, slow drying, and no better than using high-temperature enamel from a spray can.  The japanning also chipped very easily.
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#13
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
I use it a lot and have had great results.  I travel quite a bit for work so I can leave a plane sit for a while without worry while it cures.  I've found it is best to keep the first coat thin and then do a second.  stick it in the oven and bake for about an hour.  I am only recently married again so I'm sure using the oven and stinking up the house will not be an option any more. my second choice will be stick it on the grill and close the lid and I think putting the plane on pan will be best as well.  Absolutely best results have been to paint, bake, paint and bake again.  Generally, I let it dry upside down.  I use to boards near the rear and front to elevate the plane some.  The taller sides near the frog/throat have more japanning that can drip/run, better that it runs right off the plane and onto the table than pool where the plane rests.  The smaller sides on each end have less area and don't usually run as much.
Pat
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#14
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
Pat, what type of brush do you use?
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#15
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
I only use it in the summer time. I stick the plane out in the sun and let it bake after I lightly paint it. A couple of coats does the trick. I use an artist brush to apply it. Liberty on the Hudson sells old pontypool, but it's not cheap. A quart will last you a lifetime though.
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#16
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
I've used it on 8 planes. I only use it on the ones that are truly worthy of a full, top quality restoration. Otherwise, I use the engine spray paint.
Pontypool is the reason my wife still tells the story of the night she and the kids spent in a hotel, while I had to sleep at the house. The fumes from baking the Pontypool are horrid and persistent. I learned the hard way. I now have a spare oven in a separate building at a friend's home.

The Pontypool is worth the extra effort only rarely, and on rare planes that deserve the closest to original restoration. Just my opinion, of course.
" The founding fathers weren't trying to protect citizens' rights to have an interesting hobby." I Learn Each Day 1/18/13

http://www.RUSTHUNTER.com
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#17
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
Thanks, yes I've seen a posting on another forum that said exactly the same thing. The no 8 is way to big for a toaster oven and I'm not going to get away with putting it in the oven. If it takes a long time to cure, thats not a problem as I'm in no rush to use it now.
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#18
  Re: Using Pontypool by CloseShave (A friend of mine gav...)
(03-11-2017, 09:45 AM)CloseShave Wrote: Pat, what type of brush do you use?

Sorry for the delay in response, I moving and haven't been on as much lately.  I started with cheap disposable brushes and still use them but I get the heavier nylon bristles.  Japanning is self leveling so you just want to get it on the plane.  The key is to use a brush that doesn't shed.
pat
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