Using router for first time
#11
  
Hi

I wondered if anyone could give me some tips or advice

I just order myself a combo kit router. I am going to attempt to install a butchers block breakfast bar and counter top. Both are 1-1/2 inch American maple.

To start with a got myself a 1/4 inch roundover bit to give a nice edge, watching videos this looks to be easy enough after a bit of practice on straps.

I also need to cut a hole for the cooktop. From what I can gather one of the easiest ways (or at least less likely to screw up) to do this is cut the hole with a jig saw and clean up with the router. Does it sound a good idea to create a template from mdf and use a template bit. I'm hoping by doing this it would leave me less room for error. I thought it maybe it would be better for me to get a pattern bit that is smaller than 1-1/2 inches and do it in 2 passes as 1-1/2 inches is pretty thick making it harder for a newbie to control the router.

Lastly I would like to countersink the hole for the cooktop so it sits flush, so far I haven't looked into this but hoping you guys could help.

Thanks
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#12
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
As you know, shallow passes are the way to go with the round over. Be extra careful as you come to corners and the router loses support.

I think that countersinking the cooktop will make the job much more complex than necessary and create a cleaning problem when spills get in the groove. If you let it sit on top, you can make a relatively rough cut with a jigsaw since it will be hidden.
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#13
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
What router did you get?
Mikie's Shop

Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

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#14
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
Google router tips there will be plenty in form of magazine articles, or you can select videos, and watch all day at You Tube. I find it easiest to do cut inside of edges with an edge guide.

Edge guides can be store bought, or ho made


For edges I like an oversized baseplate with a handle to help to keep the router from getting tippy. Again store bought or ho made.





Your plan for the sink is what I would do, just make sure to get a good non splintering jigsaw blade. Bosch is best for those.


Welcome to the forum
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#15
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
(03-19-2017, 05:19 PM)Steve N Wrote: Google router tips there will be plenty in form of magazine articles, or you can select videos, and watch all day at You Tube. I find it easiest to do cut inside of edges with an edge guide.

Edge guides can be store bought, or ho made


For edges I like an oversized baseplate with a handle to help to keep the router from getting tippy. Again store bought or ho made.





Your plan for the sink is what I would do, just make sure to get a good non splintering jigsaw blade. Bosch is best for those.


Welcome to the forum

Good advice! FWIW, the "guru" of all things router is Pat Warner, aka "Routerman", a frequent contributor on this forum. His web site is here. That edge guide and other fixtures for routers are also on his site - lots of information there!

Good luck,

Doug
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#16
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
If this is your first time using a router, I would suggest practicing on scrap the same thickness as your countertop. A router can get away from you even if you've used one before and you don't want to ruin your finished piece
Looks easy in videos but you need to get a feel for the tool for balance and feed rate
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#17
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
One of the most important ideas you need for router use is to go in the correct direction, because the router can run out of control if you go the wrong way.  It's described very well on Highland Woodworking's website: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/routersgoleft.aspx

The other thing I'd mention is that 1 1/2" is quite thick.  If you trim that much edge, you should do it in stages so as not to try to cut too much at once.  A template guide and straight bit with a template between the work and router base would be a good way to start the cut, but you may not have enough bit extension to reach the entire edge.  Make sure you always have enough of the bit in the collet.  

Once you have cut down into the work guided by the template, you can switch to a pattern bit or flush trim bit to trim the rest, guided by the clean edge.  Or it may be that you only need to trim the top part of the sink opening, as rest may be covered by the sink.

A router is a simple tool, but some knowledge is needed to use it safely and effectively.  A book is a good idea, as are videos.  The problem with youtube is that it takes some knowledge to distinguish the people who know what they are doing from those who are one instant from disaster.  If you find a detailed description online, you can ask here whether it's a good way to go.  You will never find complete agreement on anything (except maybe that statement) but there should be enough agreement to prevent injury.
"Consider it tuition; every mistake you make, if you're paying attention, improves your skills, and allows you to make ever more sophisticated mistakes. "
Bill Houghton
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#18
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
(03-20-2017, 09:36 AM)Alan S Wrote: The other thing I'd mention is that 1 1/2" is quite thick.


OP Posted "1/4 inch roundover bit to give a nice edge" Wouldn't matter if the total edge was 6' tall, he's talking about just dusting off the edge. He'll find out how deep he can go on the particular wood he has at hand. Pine, that's a full on cut, Ironwood, many passes. but those are the things harder to teach. As long as he does it safely he'll be fine. Worst case is he will gouge an edge, less likely with a router base giving him greater control.

Your bit about router direction is spot on though, good thought.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#19
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
On the top of the router, draw an arrow indicating direction of spin.  Move against the router bit spin direction.  Until you get comfortable.
They told me anybody could do it, but I showed them.
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#20
  Re: Using router for first time by bulbous_blues (Hi I wondered if ...)
Position you hold the router really makes no difference. Just know as you look at both, that in your hands to move Left to Right, unless you do want to make a climb cut. That applies to routing on the OUTSIDE edge of something. If you are routing the inside of a cut out piece your direction gets flipped. In a table almost always go right to left, just a few exceptions. Putting the direction on the top will work much of the time. When doing NEW stuff with any tool, research the "how to do it safely part" before flipping the on switch.

More words, but better understanding


WoodCraft version
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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