table saw blades
#8
  
My shop sees a variety of projects each week and I have chosen to keep a combination blade on the table saw rather than switch out for each operation. This week we're working on a wine cellar project that has us building what amounts to a room full of plywood bookcases. We are at the very limit of what our small shop can handle and have several days ahead of us.

We're into it for 21 sheets of 3/4 oak plywood. With that in mind I swapped to a 100-tooth plywood blade. We did the bulk of machine work today and came away with some observations.

First, the fine-tooth blade spins much quieter than the combo. Moving less air, I suppose.

Next, the feed rate has to be slowed down.

Finally, the finish cut is a lot cleaner when using the correct tool for the job.

SIDE NOTE: We have a second table saw in the shop. Since we make a lot of 1x12 guitar speaker boxes, we leave it set up with a dado blade at the precise width for 3/4 plywood and roll it out when needed. We used it a lot today as well for the top and bottom insert locations. Nice to not have to fuss with the thing.


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#9
  Re: table saw blades by Harold O. (My shop sees a varie...)
Have you ever tried a HI-ATB blade for plywood? Makes really nice cuts on the face veneer and feeds faster than the 100-tooth blades.
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#10
  Re: table saw blades by Harold O. (My shop sees a varie...)
(04-11-2017, 12:35 AM)Wild Turkey Wrote: Have you ever tried a HI-ATB blade for plywood? Makes really nice cuts on the face veneer and feeds faster than the 100-tooth blades.

Thanks, I will look into the HI-ATB.

I've not experimented much with table saw blades. The 100-tooth piece was likely one in a package of three or four generic blades from Lowes. For my main blade I do spend a bit and use Freud, mostly because it was easy to find and works as good as I need. We're searching for a larger shop space and when we find it, we'll be taking in a this table saw. Then we'll have one setup specifically for plywood, another for solid wood, and the third will remain a dado-only. We'll pay more-better special attention to the blades at that point.
Just because shooting fish in a barrel is easy, that doesn't mean there are some fish that should remain unshot.
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#11
  Re: table saw blades by Harold O. (My shop sees a varie...)
(04-11-2017, 12:35 AM)Wild Turkey Wrote: Have you ever tried a HI-ATB blade for plywood?  Makes really nice cuts on the face veneer and feeds faster than the 100-tooth blades.

Bingo!  A good high tooth count blade with a Hi-ATB grind will leave the lowest amount of tear out possible.  Infinity 010-060 or 010-080, Freud LU79 or LU80, CMT 210.080.10, and several other similar blades will be leave a really nice edge.  I suppose the downside for high volume applications is edge life...those pointy tips abrade faster than something like a triple chip grind (TCG).
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#12
  Re: table saw blades by Harold O. (My shop sees a varie...)
(04-12-2017, 08:59 AM)knotscott Wrote: Bingo!  A good high tooth count blade with a Hi-ATB grind will leave the lowest amount of tear out possible.  Infinity 010-060 or 010-080, Freud LU79 or LU80, CMT 210.080.10, and several other similar blades will be leave a really nice edge.  I suppose the downside for high volume applications is edge life...those pointy tips abrade faster than something like a triple chip grind (TCG).

True story on the wear. Though this 100-tooth blade was mostly new when we started, the many, many, many (many!) passes we've made over the past two days have noticeably changed it. The finish cut is still good, but I have to be more conscious of the feed rate. It's just my daughter and I in the shop and we have noticed a similar change in our work capacity.
Just because shooting fish in a barrel is easy, that doesn't mean there are some fish that should remain unshot.
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#13
  Re: table saw blades by Harold O. (My shop sees a varie...)
(04-10-2017, 09:41 PM)Harold O. Wrote: Finally, the finish cut is a lot cleaner when using the correct tool for the job.

You said a mouthful right there. I usually have on hand a combo WWII or similar for rough cuts, but for glue line rips, exact sled crosscuts, and any plywood work that is finish sized I always swap blades. If you get to doing it, you will find it only takes a minute or two, HF sells loose wrenches from broken up sets, and getting one for every TS you own won't cost much, hang it on the saw case, Keep the blades you will use close, and it isn't much work. The time you spend swapping blades will be tripled in less finishing time easily.
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#14
  Re: table saw blades by Harold O. (My shop sees a varie...)
OK, I lied. I had to swap out the blade again today for the next process and the plywood blade is 180 and not 100 as advertised. The other point I missed was that when cutting a lot of plywood, humidity goes toward zero pretty quick.

Trading blades is a simple enough task, I know. Laziness takes over. And not doing it keeps me from having to learn one more woodworking thing.

My shop does a lot of plywood boxes and I struggle to keep away from becoming a cabinet guy. But I sure have been cranking out 8-ft x 24in bookcases this year. The current project calls for 16 of them plus corners.
Just because shooting fish in a barrel is easy, that doesn't mean there are some fish that should remain unshot.
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