What to look for in a moulding plane
#9
  
Someone near me is selling 12 moulding planes. They were made by the Auburn Tool Co. and Howland Tool Co. I have not seen them in person yet, but 12 moulding planes for $ 100.00 sounds like a bargain. If you were going to look at these antique planes what would be closely evaluating?
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#10
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
(04-20-2017, 12:42 PM)JSpill Wrote: Someone near me is selling 12 moulding planes. They were made by the Auburn Tool Co. and Howland Tool Co. I have not seen them in person yet, but 12 moulding planes for $ 100.00 sounds like a bargain. If you were going to look at these antique planes what would be closely evaluating?

#1 is the body straight, not warped, bowed or otherwise wacky
#2 condition of boxing if present, or edges/corners if not boxed
#3 condition of wedges
#4 condition of blades
#5 usefulness of profiles to me
#6 pitch angle, skewed blades or other features that make them cleaner cutting such as tight mouth

It has been my experience that people selling bunches of planes who don't typically specialize in tools tend to misidentify them. Either by original purpose or value/rarity.

Request photos.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#11
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
I would mostly agree with Rob except I care little about wedges, they are an easy replacement.  If the bodies are trashed, offer them a dollar apiece for the blades.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#12
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
Exactly what Rob said. Most parts are not interchangeable, so I look for users. A good user plane can be $25 and up. So if half of these planes are good users, then $100 is a good full up retail price. If they are beat up and rusty then $100 is not so hot. It is sure worth a look.
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#13
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
(04-20-2017, 03:25 PM)blackhat Wrote: I would mostly agree with Rob except I care little about wedges, they are an easy replacement.  If the bodies are trashed, offer them a dollar apiece for the blades.

My problem with wedges is they are either damaged (broken at either end) or the WRONG WEDGE.  If it is a group of planes, there's a better than even chance the wedges are just mixed up.

I'd rather use the planes than spend a lot of time rehabilitating and fabricating parts.  So wedges mater a bit more to me.

If the body has some warp/twist/wacky even the correct wedge may not be seating correctly.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#14
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
1.  Do I need that profile
2.  Can I use that profile
3  Condition

There is not a lot of demand for wooden molding planes, so even if you buy them for $10 each, it is not like you can resell them next year for $20.

Don't value by the  group because if there are 5 you never use, the price is $20 per plane, not $10.   Instead, I would look at each plane and run through the above.  If you need it, put it in the need pile, if you don't need it, but think you can use it, put in in a separate pile, then ignore the rest.  Then go through the ones you need, determine condition, then value it, and do the same on the can use,  and add up the values.   You might add a little to the value in the "need"  pile and deduct a little on the "can use"  and if the total value is $100 or less, go ahead and buy, if he won't sell individual ones, then pass. 
 I have a number of molding profile planes that in extremely good condition, but that is because that were in that condition when i bought them long ago, but I have never used them.  BTW, the simpler the plane, the more likely it will used - like a rabbit plane or even a small hollow or round.   Unless you need that exact profile, you will probably never use  a complex molding plane.   I agree with Blackhat that for the planes you don't need, a dollar or so per blade is fair, since you might be able to rework the blade to fit another plane.
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#15
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
Thank you for the prompt replies. I will now be able to check out these planes with confidence in knowing what I'm looking for.
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#16
  Re: What to look for in a moulding plane by JSpill (Someone near me is s...)
Here is a box of some I have acquired over the years.




Single and double sash planes, some T&Gs, hollows and rounds, etc.
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