have 110 need 220
#16
  Re: have 110 need 220 by mdickmann (I need 220 for a cou...)
There are units that will do what you want, safely. I sketched out a circuit once, using three relays (2 signal, one power) and two incoming 15 or 20A power cords. The relays are so that one line can't backfeed the other, as they're never connected through a load unless both feeds have power. There are commercial units that do that, but I'd have to sniff around to find them. Like the one Ohio Mike posted (didn't see the link). And there are others.

But I agree that you should examine the actual loads on existing circuits, as it's common to have very light loads (worst-case) on their own circuits when they don't need to be. But you can't just take a lightly loaded circuit and add more to it, unless you're sure that lightly loaded circuit doesn't already have more on it that you didn't know about. Like a sump pump on a general purpose circuit in a finished basement that's not normally heavily loaded, at least until that pump comes on. As a made-up example. It's something to consider, at least.
Tom

“This place smells like that odd combo of flop sweat, hopelessness, aaaand feet.”







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#17
  Re: have 110 need 220 by mdickmann (I need 220 for a cou...)
(04-22-2017, 06:27 PM)mdickmann Wrote: Maybe, but I think the box is already full of mini-breakers.  Seems like it has a lot of breakers for my average size house.

Depends on what you mean by "mini-breakers".  There are "slim line" breakers that look like 2 pole breakers (I guess they technically are) but take the place of a single pole breaker so that you can get two circuits off of the same slot.  Instead of 220V between the two poles as in a normal double pole breaker, you would get 0V between them since they come off the same side of the bus.  I believe this is what the other response was talking about.  If you have a bunch of these types of breakers in your panel, then you should look at putting in a subpanel.  Otherwise, I would see if I could combine a couple of circuits into a couple of slim line circuits, assuming your panel manufacturer makes them.  I hesitate to recommend combining circuits just because some are lightly loaded.  I, personally, like to be able to shut off, say, the receptacles in a single room or the lights in a single room, so I have been adding circuits to my home panel to break up circuits by rooms.

I, personally, would not try using two 120V circuits to make a 220V circuit by patching together cords or anything like that.

Paul
Paul
They were right, I SHOULDN'T have tried it at home!
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#18
  Re: have 110 need 220 by mdickmann (I need 220 for a cou...)
Just suck it up and put in a sub-panel. You will sleep better at night.

Also, this time next year, you will figure out yet another need for a breaker and you will be equally screwed.

If you main panel is not in your shop space, just run 60 amps out there and put up a panel. Way easier to do it once and be done.
Rocket Science is more fun when you actually have rockets. 

"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government." -- Patrick Henry
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#19
  Re: have 110 need 220 by mdickmann (I need 220 for a cou...)
If your box is full and you have no room for split breakers to make space, you're screwed.  You have no choice but to put in a bigger panel.  This is an expensive job but its a good investment if you plan on having a shop with 240V motors.

You're only option is to analyze your circuits and consolidate what you can but you need an electrician to help you do this.

BTW have you actually looked? I've seen more than one panel with breakers just taking up space.


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#20
  Re: have 110 need 220 by mdickmann (I need 220 for a cou...)
(04-27-2017, 11:26 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: If your box is full and you have no room for split breakers to make space, you're screwed.  You have no choice but to put in a bigger panel.  This is an expensive job but its a good investment if you plan on having a shop with 240V motors.

You're only option is to analyze your circuits and consolidate what you can but you need an electrician to help you do this.

BTW have you actually looked?  I've seen more than one panel with breakers just taking up space.
That is a little apocalyptic. The problem is easily solved with a sub-panel. I'd seldom recommend replacing a main panel for this application. Also, for many folks, working with electricity does not necessarily require an electrician.


There is never such a condition as an "only option". There are multiple good ways to skin this cat.
Rocket Science is more fun when you actually have rockets. 

"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government." -- Patrick Henry
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