Engineer Square needed
#11
  
Hello,

Basic/new woodworker.  I need to get an engineer square i believe as I am trying to square up my fence of my saws to the bed.  this would also be used for my planer in addition confirm my cuts are square.  

I started noticing what i believe to be things out of square when i would edge glue boards at times.  If i had to do a number of them the surface would cup leading me to believe that my fences or blade are not square some place.  I have a carpenter square which i think is showing me my table saw fence is off at minimum but tuff to tell.  Also this doesn't not give me the detail i need to see if my cuts are square.

This is what is leading me to buying these.  I want to check that and my cuts are square.  

I was thinking about this set for starters and maybe I don't even need a set and simply a 4 or 6" would suffice since I don't own one today?  
http://www.grizzly.com/products/4-pc-Mac...rizzly.com

In addition and maybe related, but i would also liked to find a tool that allows me to determine an angle of a board.  For example, i want to try and make a simple wood chair and want to angle the back 8-10 degrees possibly.  Today I don't really have a good way to do this.  

Any thoughts or is there one tool that can do both perhaps?

Thanks.
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#12
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
You will find lots of uses for the set you linked.

You may also find some use for a digital protractor as well if you need to work with angles other than 90 degrees.

Duke
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#13
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
First, welcome to the forum.

You will get a lot of opinions about squares, but in my view the Griz set will likely do well for you, their tolerances are good enough for woodworking, and they are affordable.

You'll also get a lot of opinions on angle finders.  To try and keep it simple, for angles you need a bevel and a protractor; suitable bevels can be had for $10 or less at the Home Depot/Lowes, protractors abound.  There are also devices that are combination, and also digital; General makes a digital bevel and a digital angle finder you can also get at the HD for $20 or so.  There are also more sophisticated devices, Starrett makes an digital angle protractor but its pricey at $100+.  I try and keep it simple and use a bevel and protractor. . . .  Smile
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Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#14
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
For 90 degrees, just get the plastic drafting triangles.  You can check both sides of the blade to make sure is is normal to the saw table surface.  I use a feeler gauge to dial in the settings.
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#15
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
(04-24-2017, 11:20 AM)YSU65 Wrote: For 90 degrees, just get the plastic drafting triangles.  You can check both sides of the blade to make sure is is normal to the saw table surface.  I use a feeler gauge to dial in the settings.

The plastic drafting triangles are certainly accurate enough.  I prefer a metal set like the one linked from Grizzly because you can stand the square up on the table without holding it.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#16
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
That price is hard to argue against...however...all of my squares have measurements.  The squares I use the most are 4" and 6" double squares. 

You do need good squares, that is a must!

Good luck
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#17
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
The way your questions are posed it appears you have a non perpendicular blade which the squares shown would assist in for that. 

you also state you think the fence is out which is an entirely different issue. To rectify that you need to determine that the saw carriage is parallel to the table saw slots then you can reset your fence parallel to the slot for a parallel cut. 

Several of us here use a .05 brass screw into the end grain of a scrap of wood attached to the miter gauge (clamped) to determine the error ( if any ) of the top to the blade. by setting the wood and the screw next to a tooth at the start of the cut then rotating the same tooth to the back and sliding the stick still clamped to the miter gauge to the back to figure out the amount the blade is not aligned with the miter slot. 

This is a perfectly satisfactory way to accomplish the task and it costs about .05 to do. The hard part s not as simple on a lot of cheaper saws, but you can accomplish it most of the time. 


To your last question a bevel gauge and a protractor will get you the angles you need to build a chair
Joe
Let us not seek the Republican Answer , or the Democratic answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future  John F. Kennedy 



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#18
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
(04-24-2017, 11:20 AM)YSU65 Wrote: For 90 degrees, just get the plastic drafting triangles.  You can check both sides of the blade to make sure is is normal to the saw table surface.  I use a feeler gauge to dial in the settings.

(04-24-2017, 11:52 AM)AHill Wrote: The plastic drafting triangles are certainly accurate enough.  I prefer a metal set like the one linked from Grizzly because you can stand the square up on the table without holding it.

+1.  Plastic triangle is plenty good enough, the metal set is better.  For a one time use, like setup, grab the least expensive, but accurate tool for the job.  However, the square is one of the most used shop tools you will buy.  I don't know about the accuracy of the Grizzly, but others say it is good, so I will accept that.  Like Bill Holt, I use the double square a lot.  I do not have a machinist's square.  My vote is for a double square.  This is what I have, from iGauging (https://www.amazon.com/iGaging-Double-Sq...ble+square)

[Image: 61tM4WLA8gL._SL1000_.jpg]
I tried not believing.  That did not work, so now I just believe
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#19
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
I agree with Bill.  I use 4" and 6" double squares the most.  You can get used, high quality, Starrett, Brown & Sharpe or Lufkin squares on the bay for reasonable prices if you have the time to look.  A square is one of the most fundamental and important tools you will use.  IMO buying the highest quality you can afford, for this tool, is worth it.

Another square I use a lot is a 9" Starrett.  Unfortunately, Starrett no longer makes them.  I like them because you actually have more than 6" of usable rule.

Lonnie
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#20
  Re: Engineer Square needed by bline22 (Hello, Basic/new ...)
(04-24-2017, 03:20 PM)Cecil Wrote: +1.  Plastic triangle is plenty good enough, the metal set is better.  For a one time use, like setup, grab the least expensive, but accurate tool for the job.  However, the square is one of the most used shop tools you will buy.  I don't know about the accuracy of the Grizzly, but others say it is good, so I will accept that.  Like Bill Holt, I use the double square a lot.  I do not have a machinist's square.  My vote is for a double square.  This is what I have, from iGauging (https://www.amazon.com/iGaging-Double-Sq...ble+square)

[Image: 61tM4WLA8gL._SL1000_.jpg]

As the other folks mentioned, the plastic squares work for the table saw.  I use my double square and combination squares for just about everything else.  Reason is that I use plastic is that I had a really bad combination square when I first started so I went with plastic.   Finally realized it was bad and bought new metal squares but still use the plastic out of habit.  Have not made a bad item since.  Yes
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