Shaper vs Router
#27
  Re: Shaper vs Router by MakinAmess (Please explain the a...)
The only thing I would add is that a Shaper is more of a production tool meaning that you are making lots of the same type of profiles or making profiles that are large then it would make sense to get one.  A long time ago I got a griz with the idea that I could use it instead of a router table, but all it did was take up space.  And you really do need to use a power feeder with it since it can grab the work out of your hands if you are not careful.  For most folks working out of their home shop or garage, a router table will do the trick for them.  And yes, you can spend big bucks on a fancy router table with a fancy lift system and fence.
Reply
#28
  Re: Shaper vs Router by MakinAmess (Please explain the a...)
I have both a router table and a big shaper with a stock feeder. I probably use them both equally. This leads me to the only advantages I see of a router table over a shaper. Router bits are cheaper and more readily available for a hobbiest. I would prefer to use my shaper all the time but I have a much bigger variety of router bits. All my heavy use profiles I have shaper cutters for. For the profiles I only use every once in awhile I will just pick up a router bit. Up front a shaper is probably going to cost you less than a high end router table but the investment in cutters is something that should be considered.
Reply
#29
  Re: Shaper vs Router by MakinAmess (Please explain the a...)
Small cheap typically 3hp and under asian sub 700lb shapers or older used shapers cost less than well outfitted router tables sure. Euro shapers are a whole other expense and feature pack. You get into much more sophisticated fence options with safety solutions with re positionability and measurment features, you get tilting spindles, quick release spindles of far superior substantial profiles and tapers, many more clearence rings, many more speed configurations, superior dust collection above and below the table, significantly more mass, and potentially sliding tables and tenoning tables. Mainstream shapers have accessory options that can cost as much as a whole shop full of asian us style large tools. Some shapers can use cutters 9" in diameter or better, and most are far smoother running due to vfds and superior control circuits and sheer mass. Most have great access to control stations and estops and safety provisions like brakes as well and have table positions made for feeders that make using them or swinging them away very simple. Even these machines are quickly surpased in the investment in tooling especially euro insert tooling. Many classes of shapers out there.


Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

Reply
#30
  Re: Shaper vs Router by MakinAmess (Please explain the a...)
Elderly European spindle moulders (shapers) with just slightly fewer features than the new ones often cost the same as a router with router table. Sometimes you can get one for significantly less than the cost of a router alone.
Those are super heavy duty machines in need of some repairs or minor safety upgrades that big industries just don't want to bother with anymore after they fired the service guy in the name of modern efficiency and increased turnaround per employee.
I have been told of similar machines being sold for similar prices in your country too.

I have around 1000 euros (just over 1000 dollars) tied up in my SCM l'Invincibile T160. It is entirelt made from cast iron. I think it weighs around 1000 kilos. The spindle tilts forward to 45 degrees.
I have had it apart entirely and rebuilt everything that shoved signs of wear or damage. Almost half it's cost went into new bearings. Angular contact precision bearings for industrial use don't come cheap.
I also made all the modern guards for it and a new fence with all the features that the long lost original fence had. Apart from the quick adjustment features which weren't invented back then my old T160 should be equal to any modern day top end industrial spindle moulder that would cost at least 10 times as much.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
Part timer living on the western coast of Finland. Not a native speaker of English
Reply
#31
  Re: Shaper vs Router by MakinAmess (Please explain the a...)
To my understanding they are the same thing.  But, the shaper has more HP, larger work surface, and more available bits for it.

We have been wanting a bigger router set up then the small 14"x14" we have now and it really does the wood is not stable on the table because of it.  A good router set up is $900 to $1400 and as I take it a shaper is about the same so why not the shaper?


http://www.grizzly.com/products/3-HP-Shaper/G1026


http://www.grizzly.com/products/Sliding-...aper/G8622

The last one is a sliding shaper and looks really nice
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
Reply
#32
  Re: Shaper vs Router by MakinAmess (Please explain the a...)
I had a shaper and got rid of it. Started using a router which I now rarely use.

I now prefer using hollows and rounds and my Stanley 45 or 55. More relaxing, quieter and cleaner.
George

if it ain't broke, you're not tryin'
Quando omni flunkus, moritati.
Red Green

Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)