Kitchen make-over
#11
  
I posted this is Home Improvements, however I doubt many here go there. For those who are curious about my builds over the past 5 months, and why the relative lack of activity here, this is what I have been up to ...

One other comment while I have the soapbox, is a request for the posting of more builds, either completed pieces or build-alongs. And also for criticism from readers who feel they can offer something. I would rather someone tear apart my work with constructive criticism than praise a poorly designed piece. Part of the reason I post builds is to inspire others to do the same, while the other part is to learn from you. Off the soapbox now ...

The past few months have been taken up with a kitchen make over. There are two articles on my website.

The first deals with building Shaker doors in Hard Maple, and hand finishing with a water-based poly:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/K...build.html

The second article is the completed kitchen:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/K...plete.html

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#12
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
Nice looking layout. And a great way to rehab. I wish ours could be that easy.

A word of advice: Your last refrigerator lived for 35 years. You will want to have a very good maintenance contract for as long as you can afford said contract on the new refer; and expect a life of about 10 years. The plastic parts wore out in ten years on our nuptials refer. Not very many plastic parts on it. The new one is about 90 percent plastic. We had 3 calls and major(?) replacements in the water/ice unit in the first 3 years--a bad design that was fixed by the third time. But, this is indicative of newer, planned obsolescence. You will freak when you see how they fix/ built that costly tub. Note, you need a 26 cubic foot refer to replace a 17 foot original. Ask me how I know. Oops, you already know, if you keep a full load.  BTW, energy savings is a bad joke. Samsung cooked the numbers for our model.

Water-based poly may not yellow; still too new in my thinking. The concern I have about the finish is being in a highly wet environment. "They say..." But, I don't buy the hype that it can be used in wetter locations. Definitely not on flooring.

Don't call your cabinets "Shaker Style". Christian Becksvoort will calve a rhino--I'd say giraffe, expected, so--and beat you with his dovetail tools. What you built are kitchen frame and panel. 

My honest, non-critical, no BS opinions. Hopefully, productive. Smirk

Bruce

Ps. The fun part is to compare your costs with contractor's. I hope your granite didn't negate the light wood cabinetry. Oh, how many glasses and plates have you broken?
Bruce
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#13
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
Hi Bruce

Thanks for the comments.

The fridge (and the range hood) are by Fisher and Paykel, who are a New Zealand company. Are they available in the US? In Australia they are about double the price of Samsung, and the quality shows when side-by-side (we did this comparison - I would rather have spent less!). The old fridge was built in Italy (whose name escapes me at this moment). Was it built differently or better? I really do not know. 

I am hoping that the water-based poly makers are true to their word, and that the colour of the Hard Maple does not change much, if at all. It radiates such a gentle aesthetic. I really love this wood, and am so envious of you lot! 







As for Becksvoort, I will call them Shaker-style! Smile   I would welcome him coming over to beat me with his chisels. I will have a couple of cold beers waiting. One for you as well.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#14
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
Derek,  nice photos.  Next time you need to apply waterbased poly to a flat surface, this is the tool  http://www.homedepot.com/p/Shur-Line-4-7.../100070177   it is hard to see, but in one of the photos you can see it has extremely short bristles, you can apply the finish by either pouring a little on the surface and using the pad to distribute, or pouring it in a pan, and dipping the pad in the pan.  Either way, when you have the  surface lightly covered, you do a final pass with the pad over the whole surface and it smooths out very well, and leaves just the right amount of finish to build pretty quickly.   It does a far better job than a foam brush.
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#15
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
Hah! Cross your fingers, Name Dropper! Yes, F&P are familiar here. The Samsung is french door too. It has 10-year-old frozen corn--in the bottom. Our 17-footer was Kenmore--cheap Sears branded something else pretty common. We knew its number was up after 25 years when the ice cream wouldn't harden; and we couldn't make the cold dial work. But, do watch when they repair a bad part.....

Maple is pretty common. We lust for Tasmanian Blackwood, Jarrah, and (?) *Blackbutt*--love your names. Your sensitivity to grain shows well.
Bruce
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#16
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
I"m looking at that panel over the fridge. Get some tearout? Maple with reversing grain can be a bit of a challenge on a par with your Aussie stuff. Not as hard to work, but demanding if you're to avoid tearout. Looks like you took quite sufficient care with yours. Nice results.
Fair winds and following seas,
Jim Waldron
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#17
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
OH, for the record: two part polyurethane (clear or pigmented) is widely used on boats. (Not used below the waterline, tho. There are limits.) That basic chemistry of "poly" is also widely used as auto finishes, with lots of exposure to rain (at least in some climes).

Most vendors of two part polyurethane also offer a less expensive water based polyurethane for a cost savings. Some are formulated for boat finishes, so kitchen moisture is not that great a challenge. The underlying chemistry is almost the same, so I think it will do nicely in your kitchen. There is a bit of loss of abrasion resistance, so scratches may be a bit greater problem, but it's still a LOT tougher than most (all?) other clear wood finishes.

For my boat work, I use two part (Awlgrip, Imron, Dulux, Interlux Perfection, etc.) and will continue to do so, some sprayed, some brushed. But for indoor floors, I've used water-based single part polyurethane, including in a couple of bathrooms with showers. They have held up quite nicely. A kitchen is less demanding.
Fair winds and following seas,
Jim Waldron
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#18
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
That's good to hear, Jim. Of course I look for the easiest and cheapest to find..... Home Despot. Which may impact the durability values. 

The workmanship is sweet. I don't think there is a single stick of straight grain. It's not major, but the chatoyance is there and will be a pleasant change of image through the hours. Curl can be overpowering. It will be perennially fresh and new looking Derek. Little or no yellowing.
Bruce
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#19
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
(05-20-2017, 05:17 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: I am hoping that the water-based poly makers are true to their word, and that the colour of the Hard Maple does not change much, if at all. It radiates such a gentle aesthetic. I really love this wood, and am so envious of you lot! 







Regards from Perth

Derek

Hi Derek;

I sent the two links you provided us above on your project to my wife for comment. She really appreciated the fine work and the subtle change in look.  She told me to let you know that was well done, the design and the work! She also wanted to know more about the sheets of green glass you used on the walls.  They are different from anything we use here.  They are not in the big box stores...
Thanks!
Skip


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#20
  Re: Kitchen make-over by Derek Cohen (I posted this is Hom...)
I have F&P washer and top-loading dryer. Absolutely amazing quality and engineering.
Carolyn

Trip Blog for Twelve Countries: [url=http://www.woodworkingtraveler.wordpress.com[/url]

"It's good to know, but it's better to understand." Auze Jackson
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