Edging Plywood
#11
  
I am planning to make some garage cabinets from Plywood and paint them. I am trying to decide how to edge the plywood in a quick efficient manner that gives a good paint surface, and some protection of the edge.

Any thoughts?
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#12
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
Plane inexpensive hardwood (oak) to thickness of plywood.
Rip to 1/2" strips.
Glue & pin to plywood edges.
Butt joint corners.
Don't get fancy: You are going to paint it.
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#13
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
What Robert said, but with a few minor differences. 

Oak takes paint poorly, poplar or maple will not show pores.

Plane the stock to 7/8" thick, then trim it flush after it is attached. It is highly unlikely that your plywood is all exactly the same thickness.

I would use 1/8" thick edging, or maybe 1/4 for paint grade. I use GRR-RIPPERs so I can quickly and safely rip 1/4" or even 1/8" strips. Using a thin rip jig on the off side of your blade is another safe method for ripping thin strips.
Ralph Bagnall
http://www.woodcademy.com
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#14
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
I built this router jig from plans in Woodsmith Issue ?  (I can find it.)  It uses a 1/2" flush trim bit, but you could adjust for a larger bit, if desired.  




Here it is in use.  It's only clamped in place so I could take a photo. 




It takes no time at all to flush trim an edge, and it's perfect when you are done.  I make the edging about a fat 1/16" wider than what I'm gluing it to, so you are only taking off a 1/32" or so on each side and that allows you to use a climb cut for a smoother finish with no worries.  The thickness can be anything up to the limit of the router bit.  




John
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#15
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
I  also use a flush trim bit to trim to correct plywood thickness, then use either a chamfer bit or a small radius bit to ease the edges.    On the kitchen cabinet shelves I used about 5/16 thick maple for durability.   Roly
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#16
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
I can't find the website that went into depth about the strengths of several different types of edging in regards to how stiff they are, or how much load they could take. You said garage, so that brings to mind heavier items than even a pantry. So far I've seen mention of just simple edging, which as you can see in the pic below is just entry level on the good to best rating. If somebody has access to the website I am thinking of, please post it. This current computer doesn't have it in "favs"



Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#17
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
Glue on edge banding works great. Get an iron and your good to go.
Don
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#18
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
On any discussion of shelves, especially for storage where weight may be involved, like shop, and garage we would be remiss not to mention The Sagulator
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#19
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
Thanks, I'll go with the solid wood, Popular edging since I have some around.

As always I was overthinking it.
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#20
  Re: Edging Plywood by sroxberg (I am planning to mak...)
(08-13-2017, 04:08 PM)DFJarvie Wrote: Glue on edge banding works great. Get an iron and your good to go.

I'll have to say that this is also my own preferred method I've been using since the 1970s when I first learned it. Put the part in a vise, edge up.   Iron on about 18", put the iron down, pick up a burnishing stick and press the edging down with a two handed hold on the stick.  The pressing with the stick sort of clamps things down well.  Further than 18" and you risk the glue cooling down and not sticking well.  I trim flush with an old jointer or planer knife well sharpened.  Trim bits in a hand router get gummed up.  Ease the edge slightly with block and sandpaper.  The hot melt glue is gummy and loads sandpaper quickly so a using a vibrator sander like a Porter Cable 330  will result in lots of time sandpaper changing.  Turn the iron's dial all the way over and back one setting.  A little experimenting will let you know how fast to go without burning things.
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