table finish
#10
  
How do I replicate this finish. Thinking about staining boards before glue up, then sanding edges and some in the middle of the boards.


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"There are no great men. Just great challenges which ordinary men,out of necessity, are forced by circumstance to meet."
Admiral William Frederick "Bull" Halsey Jr.

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#11
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
(08-30-2017, 09:27 AM)DarrellC Wrote: How do I replicate this finish. Thinking about staining boards before glue up, then sanding edges and some in the middle of the boards.

Not sure what wood you're planning on using.  If you use oak, you could soak on a mixture of white vinegar & steel wool.  That will cause the whole board to be black and you could sand the surface to give that same look.

Joel
USN (Corpsman) 1968-1972
USAF Retired Aug 31, 1994
Santa Rosa County, Fl Retired Jun 1, 2012
Now just a hobbiest enjoying woodworking!
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#12
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
That looks to me to be four pieces of 2x10 framing lumber from the shiny-cheap-thing store that are not edge glued but set together and fastened (maybe with cleats) from underneath.  Then a grey wash coat of stain applied, let dry and then the raised edges sanded.  Obviously, the lumber was put in crown side up so it cups in the middle the length of the board.  That won't be so hard to duplicate because it was so casually done in the first place.
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#13
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
Not sure what you are looking for, either, but this may be what you are aiming for http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog...ccelerator
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#14
  Re: RE: table finish by Bob Vaughan (That looks to me to ...)
(08-30-2017, 01:05 PM)Bob Vaughan Wrote: That looks to me to be four pieces of 2x10 framing lumber from the shiny-cheap-thing store that are not edge glued but set together and fastened (maybe with cleats) from underneath.  Then a grey wash coat of stain applied, let dry and then the raised edges sanded.  Obviously, the lumber was put in crown side up so it cups in the middle the length of the board.  That won't be so hard to duplicate because it was so casually done in the first place.

Bob we used to call that a pickled finish It was real popular 30 - 35 years ago. That as you point out is Pine/Fir/Spruce, and it will give a darker look than Oak, and Maple would be different yet. Wood that tended to go dark like Cherry, or Wlanut looked terrible in it. The purpose was a distressed, old look of weathered wood/driftwood/barn siding, just depended on where you were, and what you wanted to match it to. A check of a paint store, and using pickled, weathered wood finish as terms will likely still get you all in one products at places like Sherwin Williams et al.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#15
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
I am using 5/4 white oak. Originally, planned nice top with dowelled breadboard ends. Then I get this from my daughter. Guess I should have gone and got some 2x8's and slapped them together.
"There are no great men. Just great challenges which ordinary men,out of necessity, are forced by circumstance to meet."
Admiral William Frederick "Bull" Halsey Jr.

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#16
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
I would test Minwax's Ebony stain and then sand the edges to replicate wear.  

I think it has a nice rustic look.  I think pine and oak were used quite a bit by early settlers.  They used whatever wood was nearby and could easily be felled. 
 
The question becomes do you apply a modern finish or go with something like Briwax or an oil finish.

On the TV show "Rustic Renovations" they show them using Briwax for the handmade furniture from reclaimed lumber.
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#17
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
(08-30-2017, 09:27 AM)DarrellC Wrote: How do I replicate this finish. Thinking about staining boards before glue up, then sanding edges and some in the middle of the boards.

 I would try a water based dye.  It is easy to control the amount of color either by adding coats after it is dry or wiping some off with a wet rag and then sanding the edges as shown.  Then top coating.   Many people complain about the gaps between the board catching debris.   Something to think about before you make that type of top on a table used for eating.   Roly
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#18
  Re: table finish by DarrellC (How do I replicate t...)
(08-30-2017, 09:27 AM)DarrellC Wrote: How do I replicate this finish. Thinking about staining boards before glue up, then sanding edges and some in the middle of the boards.

You probably need softwood board with dye to get similar "negative" effect. Stain on oak will get you in opposite direction.

Regarding glue up -- for this finish you might consider separate boards. If you make perfect edge joints it will not look right with sanded sides, imho.

Also, please note that Woodnet has 'Finishing' forum ...
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