Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12?
#9
  
I was looking for a Stanley 112 scraper at the Hillsville fleamarket this past Labor Day and got a good deal on an early model Stanley 12.  Well.... later in the day I found what I really wanted, the 112 Sweetheart so I ended up with 2.  Oh well....

I have used a drill bit on my hand held scraper but I am thinking I would like to get a proper burnisher.  Any recommendations?  Round or oval?

Anyone here use one of these scrapers?  Which do you prefer?

Frankie


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#10
  Re: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by s9plus20 (I was looking for a ...)
Your drill bit is fine, but easier to use if you put a handle on it. I think the current fashion is to use small diameter rods, smaller than the usual store display and historic diameters. They just need to be smooth and hard, i.e., drill bits. Going for a spare 3/16 (roughly) to 1/4 is perfect, as long as there is an inch or so of shank to work with. 

Pick your favorite wood and drill away. Use the glue that gave you the most grief in the past.
Bruce
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#11
  Re: RE: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by hbmcc (Your drill bit is fi...)
(09-13-2017, 10:05 PM)hbmcc Wrote: Your drill bit is fine, but easier to use if you put a handle on it. I think the current fashion is to use small diameter rods, smaller than the usual store display and historic diameters. They just need to be smooth and hard, i.e., drill bits. Going for a spare 3/16 (roughly) to 1/4 is perfect, as long as there is an inch or so of shank to work with. 

Pick your favorite wood and drill away. Use the glue that gave you the most grief in the past.

I have a couple of the Sargent versions of the #12 and like them.  One metallic sole, one wooden sole.

But I like my vintage Stanley #112 better.  Japaning looks like crap, but works great.  

And several years ago I got the opportunity to pick up a LN version of the #112 second-hand at a bargain price.  Still like the Stanley #112 better (but I put a toothed blade in the LN and it works slick that way).

I prefer a long, round burnisher over the shorter types.  

Have a few different ones but usually grab one made by Crown and probably got it 10 years ago from Woodcraft.  I've since heard complaints about them being too soft but mine works great.  

I prefer the longer ones because I can both press and draw out during the stroke.  This is the technique that works for me.  No need to press very hard as the drawing out action does some of the work of turning the burr.

I've experimented with the shorter LN burnisher at their shows, works fine but more expensive (their branded card scrapers are also among the hardest I've tried).  Also tried the Woodcraft house branded one, priced in between Crown and LN and it works fine.  

For some scrapers I've made from old, kinked handsaw blades, the venerable back-of-the-gouge works fine.  But newer mass-produced scrapers, they tend to be harder and the gouge backs may not be hard enough.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#12
  Re: RE: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by Rob Young ([quote='hbmcc' pid='...)
(09-14-2017, 10:38 AM)Rob Young Wrote: I prefer the longer ones because I can both press and draw out during the stroke.

Amen.

Angle, press and stroke, sliding across the edge. Job done. The way I learned from a British cabinetmaker. He insisted one stroke...and it works!

Simon
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#13
  Re: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by s9plus20 (I was looking for a ...)
Phil Lowe sells a burnisher with an interesting feature you can add to any burnisher: the tip isn't flat but a 60* point.
This lets you stand-up the burr if it's laying too far over. I find this particularly useful on my curved scrapers.
My technique is such that my burr on those wanders all over the place.
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#14
  Re: RE: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by Chuck Nickerson (Phil Lowe sells a bu...)
(09-14-2017, 01:50 PM)Chuck Nickerson Wrote: Phil Lowe sells a burnisher with an interesting feature you can add to any burnisher: the tip isn't flat but a 60* point.
This lets you stand-up the burr if it's laying too far over. I find this particularly useful on my curved scrapers.
My technique is such that my burr on those wanders all over the place.

Here is the link to Phil Lowe's video showing how to sharpen a scraper and the use of his burnisher. It's well worth the watch.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7DflhyGFDU
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#15
  Re: RE: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by John Walkowiak ([quote='Chuck Nicker...)
(09-14-2017, 03:19 PM)John Walkowiak Wrote: Here is the link to Phil Lowe's video showing how to sharpen a scraper and the use of his burnisher. It's well worth the watch.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7DflhyGFDU

Thanks for the video.  Good stuff.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world, those who know binary and those who do not.
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#16
  Re: Burnisher, round or oval? Stanley 112 or 12? by s9plus20 (I was looking for a ...)
[quote='s9plus20' pid='7522854' dateline='1505353138']
I was looking for a Stanley 112 scraper at the Hillsville fleamarket this past Labor Day and got a good deal on an early model Stanley 12.  Well.... later in the day I found what I really wanted, the 112 Sweetheart so I ended up with 2.  Oh well....

I have used a drill bit on my hand held scraper but I am thinking I would like to get a proper burnisher.  Any recommendations?  Round or oval?

Anyone here use one of these scrapers?  Which do you prefer?

Frankie
[/quote,,,,,,,,,,,,
I recommend you buy a 1/4" dia. polished carbide rod from Amazon and make your own..nothing better IMO...You may also be able to find at a flea market, a 1/4" or 3/8" solid carbide end mill or router bit and use the shank for your burnisher. Just cobble up a handle for it and epoxy the bit into it.
"By God, we are First Marines, and all the communist bastards in the world cannot stop us from going where we intend to go"
Col. Chesty Puller USMC  At the  Chosin Reservoir North Korea 1950, "The Forgotten War"


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea 51/52





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