Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question
#18
  Re: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Dusty Workshop (Good morning Whil...)
That makes sense to me Angus.
I guess a work around would be to cut those 4 to 5 foot lengths down, or to make the sled bigger and use 2 runners
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#19
  Re: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Dusty Workshop (Good morning Whil...)
I admit I am pretty much stuck in my ways. I use two runner fixed sleds, no fuss, no setup, put one on the saw and go. But, I got into the segmental world way before wedgies or most of the other gadgets and programs that are out now. I do plan on getting some wedgies and trying a sled just like in your picture. If it doesn't work for me I can always use them for setup tools for fixed sleds. 

There are some claims made about wedgies that in my opinion are pure marketing gimmicks because they have no or limited use. But, as a setup tool they are probably a good value. With the recent segmenting threads I've noticed a trend and thought about starting a new thread. But it applies to anyone wanting to get into segmenting so I'll just mention it here.

There is a very good reason why Tibbets, Ray Allen and others don't recommend and very seldom use rings with odd numbers of segments in them. It's a common practice and sometimes a requirement on wider segments to glue up two half rings. Then you cut or sand the ends of the half rings dead straight for a perfect fit. This procedure forces all of the combined errors in the ring into two joints that can be made to fit perfect. When you use an odd number of rings you loose that ability. A perfect angle alone does not always guarantee a gap free ring. Just putting it out there for people who are thinking about buying wedgies.
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#20
  Re: RE: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Angus (I admit I am pretty ...)
(10-13-2017, 10:59 AM)Angus Wrote: I admit I am pretty much stuck in my ways. I use two runner fixed sleds, no fuss, no setup, put one on the saw and go. But, I got into the segmental world way before wedgies or most of the other gadgets and programs that are out now. I do plan on getting some wedgies and trying a sled just like in your picture. If it doesn't work for me I can always use them for setup tools for fixed sleds. 

There are some claims made about wedgies that in my opinion are pure marketing gimmicks because they have no or limited use. But, as a setup tool they are probably a good value. With the recent segmenting threads I've noticed a trend and thought about starting a new thread. But it applies to anyone wanting to get into segmenting so I'll just mention it here.

There is a very good reason why Tibbets, Ray Allen and others don't recommend and very seldom use rings with odd numbers of segments in them. It's a common practice and sometimes a requirement on wider segments to glue up two half rings. Then you cut or sand the ends of the half rings dead straight for a perfect fit. This procedure forces all of the combined errors in the ring into two joints that can be made to fit perfect. When you use an odd number of rings you loose that ability. A perfect angle alone does not always guarantee a gap free ring. Just putting it out there for people who are thinking about buying wedgies.
Angus,
We may agree to disagree, but I am ok with that and offer another view.  This might make for good discussions. Please take this as another view.
I too started segmented rings with two runner sleds and worked pretty good. Had 4 or 5 set at different angles.  I then watched Jerry Bennets youtube on segmentology(sp) liked from segeasy web.  I didn't think it was as easy as he made it.  So a made a fixed two fence sled using 30--60 triangle.  As he showed, I set them at odd angles so that the wedge side are at different angles. Cut 12 wedges, perfect match.  No half ring sanding.  Experimented with cutting half on one fence by flipping and half on the other fence flipping.  Perfect.  Now you will not get a perfect circle by doing this, it is distorted, but that what the lathe is for.  I have tried Jerry's method to tilt the bade to make diamonds, but after doing several it is a pain to avoid them creeping,
I was hooked, but not ready to spend money for wedges, so I made some and then remade better ones.  I am able to mix and match any size in a ring as long as the sum of the wedge angles is 360. The vase I posted in another message has every ring containing a different number of wedges.
I have also based on someone else idea been able to reverse wedges to make a top ring design.
Every time I dry fit a ring and it dosen't close I screwed up one of the wedges, sometimes twice on the same ring.

Bob
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#21
  Re: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Dusty Workshop (Good morning Whil...)
We don't have to disagree. I've always said on here and other forums there is always more than one way to skin a cat. This is more true in turning than any other aspect of woodworking. If you find any method or procedure that works for you and is safe by all means run with it. I just try to point out things that newer turners may miss or not consider.
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#22
  Re: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Dusty Workshop (Good morning Whil...)
Good insight Angus.

I am having a friend cut my wedges on his cnc.
I think that starting with wedges that create even numbers of segments per ring is a good idea, at least
for starters
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#23
  Re: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Dusty Workshop (Good morning Whil...)
Those T-tracks should do a very good job of allowing deeper segments. The only two requirements for the sled to be accurate are that 1) the sides of the top fence be really (I mean really) parallel and 2) the included angle be correct. Using almost any table saw achieves the first one and using an accurate part like a Wedgie or a 30-60-90 triangle achieves the second one.

For what it's worth, I increased the distance between fences about 2 inches on my sled because I wanted deeper segments sometimes. The down side is that when I narrower segments, I have to move the sled a lot farther to shift from one fence to the other.

I really like your solution.
To the engineer, the world is a toybox, full of sub-optimized and feature-poor toys.
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#24
  Re: Who is using a wedgie sled for cutting segments? - sled design question by Dusty Workshop (Good morning Whil...)
The slots in the tracks will also need to be extremely parallel to the sides of the fences.

I took a closer look at the pictured sled.

These red knobs look like they are too big and overhang the edges of the fences


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