Ebonizing Poplar
#11
  
I'me getting closer to having my table base completed, will soon be time to apply the ebonization process.  It's made of poplar, and I want it to be jet black.  I'm using the "Brian Boggs" method.  Details here

Did some experimenting today, the result are promising.  Tomorrow after my samples dry I will attempt to apply a top coat and see what happens.


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#12
  Re: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston (I'me getting closer ...)
Wow! That's so black that I feel like I could lose myself if I look at it too long.
Ray
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#13
  Re: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston (I'me getting closer ...)
(10-28-2017, 10:18 PM)Danny in Houston Wrote: I'me getting closer to having my table base completed, will soon be time to apply the ebonization process.  It's made of poplar, and I want it to be jet black.  I'm using the "Brian Boggs" method.  Details here

Did some experimenting today, the result are promising.  Tomorrow after my samples dry I will attempt to apply a top coat and see what happens.

That looks terrific Danny.  But why not India ink? 

John
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#14
  Re: RE: Ebonizing Poplar by jteneyck ([quote='Danny in Hou...)
(10-29-2017, 10:10 AM)jteneyck Wrote: That looks terrific Danny.  But why not India ink? 

John

From the Brian Boggs article:

Iron staining, or ebonizing, generally uses a reaction between iron oxide and the natural tannins in wood to create a natural- looking black that is actually created in the fibers of the wood rather than a stain sitting on top. This is why it is so durable. It is integral, not superficial. I have also found it to be very light-fast.
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#15
  Re: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston (I'me getting closer ...)
He was talking about it in Berea at the first WIA. A lot of folks quit India ink after that, then somewhere in there his published work started popping up, after trying it, I don't know anyone going back to India ink. Like the Man said, try it you like it......
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#16
  Re: RE: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(10-29-2017, 03:33 PM)Danny in Houston Wrote: From the Brian Boggs article:

Iron staining, or ebonizing, generally uses a reaction between iron oxide and the natural tannins in wood to create a natural- looking black that is actually created in the fibers of the wood rather than a stain sitting on top. This is why it is so durable. It is integral, not superficial. I have also found it to be very light-fast.

There are a number of ways to skin the cat. There is no single right way. Its all about how much work someone wants to do. Personally, I am an india ink guy. For me, nothing is easier or faster.

Once Favre hangs it up though, it years of cellar dwelling for the Pack. (Geoff 12-18-07)  



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#17
  Re: RE: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(10-29-2017, 03:33 PM)Danny in Houston Wrote: From the Brian Boggs article:

Iron staining, or ebonizing, generally uses a reaction between iron oxide and the natural tannins in wood to create a natural- looking black that is actually created in the fibers of the wood rather than a stain sitting on top. This is why it is so durable. It is integral, not superficial. I have also found it to be very light-fast.

India ink doesn't sit on top, it soaks in just like dye.  You are going to topcoat whatever you use anyway, right, so it will be protected.  I'm not criticizing, what you've done looks great, just seems like the long way 'round the barn. 

John
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#18
  Re: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston (I'me getting closer ...)
By chance I reread that Brian Boggs article last week. (Yes, I keep old mags so that I can read them again) It was interesting enough for me to want to give it a try so I've ripped it out.  It's in shop waiting till I get around to rounding up the materials.

I think he mentioned his problem with india ink was that he didn't care for the blue cast in the black color.
Telling a man he has too many tools,
is like telling a woman she has too many shoes.
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#19
  Re: RE: Ebonizing Poplar by Terry W (By chance I reread t...)
(11-01-2017, 08:23 AM)Terry W Wrote: By chance I reread that Brian Boggs article last week. (Yes, I keep old mags so that I can read them again) It was interesting enough for me to want to give it a try so I've ripped it out.  It's in shop waiting till I get around to rounding up the materials.

I think he mentioned his problem with india ink was that he didn't care for the blue cast in the black color.

It takes the steel wool several weeks to dissolve, and make sure you wash the steel wool first with soap and water to remove any residual oil.
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#20
  Re: Ebonizing Poplar by Danny in Houston (I'me getting closer ...)
"Iron staining, or ebonizing, generally uses a reaction between iron oxide and the natural tannins in wood to create a natural- looking black"

I didn't know that Poplar had significant amounts of tannins in it. I guess it does.
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